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5.02 - DDR20-019 PLANNING COMMISSION AGENDA REPORT APPLICATION NOs.: Downtown Design Review (DDR) 20-019; Vesting Tentative Parcel Map (SUB) 21-003 APPLICANT: Matt Graves, Eden Housing PROJECT PLANNER: Jake Potter, Assistant Planner PROJECT DESCRIPTION:Hearing to consider a request for Downtown Design Review and Vesting Tentative Parcel Map to develop the western portion of the Downtown Core site (formerly Livermore Village) with the affordable housing component of the Downtown Plan approved by the City Council on January 29, 2018. The development consists of 130 affordable residential units in two four-story buildings with underground parking. The development would include one, two, and three-bedroom units affordable to individuals and families within 20% to 60% of the Alameda County Area Median Income, landscaping, stormwater, frontage improvements, private open space, dedication of approximately 0.7 acres for a public park, and a temporary emergency vehicle access. The design of the public park is to be considered at a future date. RECOMMENDATION:Recommend City Council approval subject to conditions LOCATION: Southeast corner of Railroad Avenue and South L Street (APN: 98-289-21-1) ZONING: Downtown Specific Plan (DSP) – Core – Subarea 4D GENERAL PLAN: Downtown Area (DA) HISTORIC STATUS:None MEETING DATE: AGENDA ITEM: 04-20-20215.02 1 SITE AREA:2.5± acres CEQA STATUS: Recommend finding the project is Categorically Exempt under the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), per CEQA Guidelines Section 15182 (c), residential projects implementing specific plans. NOTICE AREA:300 feet 2 2 Project Location Notes: This map is based on City of Livermore GIS Prepared: 0166.67333.3 333.3 Information and reflects the most current information Feet at the time of this printing. The map is intended for 4/16/2021 NAD_1983_StatePlane_California_III_FIPS_0403_Feet reference purposes only and the City and its staff is 11:51:22 AM Scale:1:2,000 Livermore IT, GIS Services not responsible for errors. 3 ŷźƭ ƦğŭĻ źƓƷĻƓƷźƚƓğƌƌǤ ƌĻŅƷ ĬƌğƓƉ͵ 4 PLANNING COMMISSION STAFF REPORT TO: Chairperson Anderson and Members of the Planning Commission PREPARED BY: Jake Potter, Assistant Planner REVIEWED BY:Steve Stewart, Planning Manager Benjamin Murray, Principal Planner DATE: April 20, 2021 SUBJECT: Downtown Design Review (DDR) 20-019 and Vesting Tentative Parcel Map (VTPM) 11186 – Subdivision (SUB) 21-003 for Eden Downtown Housing SUMMARY RECOMMENDATION Staff recommends the Planning Commission recommend the City Council adopt a resolution finding the project is exempt from the California Environmental Quality Act pursuant to Section 15182 (c) of the CEQA Guidelines and approving Downtown Design Review 20-019 and Vesting Tentative Parcel Map 11186 – Subdivision 21-003, subject to the attached Conditions of Approval. The Planning Commission’s action is a recommendation to the City Council. BACKGROUND Downtown Core Plan The Downtown Specific Plan guides the community vision for downtown growth, development, and economic revitalization. Downtown Specific Plan strategies rely on blending public actions and private activities in order to continue transforming the downtown into Livermore’s center for the arts, entertainment, and commerce. Thus, the Downtown Specific Plan dually serves as a policy and implementation document, providing a strategy for change and a regulatory framework to guide and govern future development within the downtown. In April 2017, the City Council appointed a Downtown Steering Committee. Council directed the Steering Committee to develop a public engagement program for redevelopment of 1 5 City-owned sites in the Downtown Core. The Committee held a series of public meetings, considered information from experts on a variety of topics relevant to the improvement of the City’s downtown sites, and developed four land use alternatives to facilitate public dialogue and highlight the range of possibilities. The Committee also reviewed and agreed upon a public engagement plan that employed the alternatives and the Steering Committee’s key learnings. The outreach process went from August through November 2017. Community participation was very strong across the various events and through the online engagement tools. On January 29, 2018, at the conclusion of the extensive public engagement process, the City Council approved a plan for redeveloping the Downtown Core site (the former Lucky’s Site and hotel site on the east side of South Livermore Avenue and west of the Bankhead Theater). The adopted Downtown Core Plan includes a public park (Stockmen’s Park), commercial retail buildings adjacent to Blacksmith Square, a black box theater, a science and society center, multifamily workforce housing, a public parking garage, new public surface parking, a boutique hotel at the southeast corner of Railroad Avenue and South Livermore Avenue, new public streets, and street improvements. On October 26, 2020, the Council adopted Resolution 2020-177, approving a new Vesting Tentative Tract Map for the Downtown Core site. The new map divided the site into nine distinct parcels, implementing the Council’s adopted Downtown Core plan. The proposed Eden Downtown housing project would be located on the northwestern parcel of the approved map, in conformance with the adopted Downtown Core Plan. Eden Housing In May 2018, staff issued a Request for Qualifications (RFQ) to identify a qualified developer for the 130-unit, workforce housing component of the City’s Downtown Plan. Staff reviewed and evaluated qualifications submitted by eight developers. The City selected Eden Housing, Inc. (Eden) as the developer based on their experience building and managing similar housing projects, capability in securing financing for affordable housing in the Bay Area, and their ideas to address the project goals stated in the RFQ, integrate the project with other Plan components, and execute the approved Downtown Core plan. On November 26, 2018, the City Council authorized the City Manager to execute a Disposition, Development, and Loan Agreement (DDLA) with Eden for development of the Downtown residential uses in conformance with the Downtown Plan. The DDLA also provided Eden with $500,000 in City Affordable Housing Trust Funds to complete predevelopment work, design the project, and secure necessary entitlements, such as design review approval. In February 2020, Eden successfully secured $14.4 million from Alameda County’s A1 Bond Fund. Qualification for the grant funds relied upon the City’s control of the site and commitment to use the land for affordable housing. This funding will make Eden highly competitive in their applications for tax credit financing due in July 2021. The A1 Bond 2 6 Funding requires all financing for the project to be secured by January 2022. Both the A1 Bond Funds and tax credit financing are critical to constructing the affordable housing. On December 7, 2020, the City Council held a Special Meeting Workshop to review conceptual plans for the Downtown Workforce Housing and provide comments and direction regarding the project. The City Council provided direction regarding building height, footprint, architecture, density, and park size. The applicant has worked to respond to the Council’s direction and has submitted a complete application for the project. PROJECT DESCRIPTION The proposed project would redevelop the western portion of the Downtown Core site with 130 affordable residentialunits, in accordance with the approved Downtown Plan. The proposal consists of two four-story buildings, one fronting Railroad Avenue and the other fronting Veterans Way. The units will be affordable rental residential units, reserved for individuals with incomes of 20 percent to 60 percent of Alameda County Area Median Income (AMI), with a mix of one, two, and three-bedrooms. The units would range in size from 500 to 1,020 square feet, with an average size of 560 square feet for single- bedroom units, 780 square feet for two-bedroom units, and 990 square feet for three- bedroom units. Both buildings would occupy a combined footprint of approximately 38,000 square feet and would include programmed facilities like secure entries/lobbies, community/recreation rooms, managers offices, and laundry facilities. An approximately 31,200 square foot area between and southeast of the two buildings would be dedicated for a public park (Veterans Park), in accordance with the Council's adopted Downtown Core plan. Private open space would be provided adjacent to the first floor of each building and would be exclusive to resident use. In addition, a pedestrian path would connect Veterans Park to Veterans Way. Two private underground parking garages are also proposed, one underneath each building, with additional parking proposed in the nearby L Street parking garage. The project will provide 130 total spaces designated for residents only. Public improvements include two new curb cuts with associated driveways to allow access into each private parking garage, street trees, an Emergency Vehicle Access, and a pedestrian path along Veterans Way. The proposed project requires approval of: 1. A Downtown Design Review land use entitlement (DDR 20-019), which is for review of the proposed site design, architecture, and landscape; and 2. A Vesting Tentative Parcel Map (SUB21-003), which establishes the site grading, circulation, public infrastructure, and parcel lines. Chapter 10 of the Downtown Specific Plan establishes the Planning Commission as the review authority for new projects that include 40 or more residential units and the City Council for projects that propose heights taller than three floors or 45 feet. The City Council is the final review authority. 3 7 The Planning Commission will be operating in its quasi-judicial role in reviewing the proposed project, which means that their recommendation to the Council will be focused on whether the project submitted is consistent with the requirements of the Downtown Specific Plan, the General Plan and any other applicable requirements. Comparison to Adopted Plan The Downtown Core Plan, adopted by the City Council in January 2018, is a conceptual design for the completion of Downtown Redevelopment. In approved the plan the Council identified several key objectives for the workforce housing component, including: providing 130 affordable units; creating a large central public park; and partnering with a developer who has a demonstrated success with securing financing for affordable units and experience in developing and managing affordable housing projects. In accordance with these objectives, Eden Housing was selected as the project’s affordable housing developer given their history of successfully developing and maintaining similar projects throughout the Bay Area and in Livermore, including the Stoney Creek Apartments. The proposed development includes 130 affordable units and a large public park. However, State affordable housing grant funding requirements necessitated changes in the mix of units and unit sizes compared to those initially contemplated for the project. Current California Affordable Housing Tax Credit Financing standards require a mix of one, two, and three bedroom unit types with larger unit sizes than was originally envisioned. These requirements have necessitated changes in the building and site design. As a result of these financing requirements, and in order to maintain the approved number of affordable units, improve efficiencies and maximize the park size, the four separate buildings shown in the City’s concept plan were merged into two four-story buildings. The revised project provides more livable interior open space and resident amenities such as common rooms, computer rooms, and management office space. The modified building footprint resulted in decreased street setbacks in some areas, although the setbacks still exceed the minimum requirements of the Downtown Specific Plan. The overall size of Veterans Park, at 31,212 square feet, exceeds the 24,000 square feet identified in the City’s easement agreement with Eden. The proposed project meets key workforce housing criteria of the City Council’s adopted Downtown Core plan, including providing 130 affordable units, a large public area for Veterans Park, and partnering with an experienced affordable housing developer. Modifications to the building design increase the quality and livability of the residential project and also increase its competitiveness tax credit financing, while maintaining a large public park with room for a playground and an expansive public green. PROJECT SITE CONTEXT The Downtown Eden Housing site is approximately two acres in net size (approximately 2.5 gross acres including half of the adjacent Railroad Avenue Right-of-Way) and is located at the southeast corner of L Street and Railroad Avenue. It is situated within the approximately 4 8 seven-acre Downtown Core site that consists of nine parcels, as approved by the City Council on October 26, 2020. The project site is bounded to the west by L Street, to the north by Railroad Avenue, to the south by Veterans Way, and to the east by Stockmen’s Park and yet-to-be-developed parcels. The project site is currently void of any buildings, relatively flat, and contains temporary light standards and a mix of paved and decomposed gravel surfaces for Downtown parking. Former uses of the site include a commercial center, which housed Lucky’s Supermarket, and the Southern Pacific Railroad Depot, which was relocated to the Livermore Transit Center in July 2017. The surrounding parcels to the south and east will ultimately contain the Black Box Theater, the Quest Science Center, commercial uses, and the L Street public parking garage. The following table summarizes the General Plan land use designation, current zoning classification, and existing land use on the subject property and surrounding properties. Table 1: Project Site Context General Plan Current Zoning Classification Existing Land Use Designation Subject Downtown Area Downtown Specific Plan,Public Parking Site Downtown Core Subarea4D North Downtown Area Downtown Specific Plan,Commercial Downtown Neighborhood North Side South Downtown Area Downtown Specific Plan,Public Parking Downtown Core Subarea 4E East Downtown Area Downtown Specific Plan,Public Parking Downtown Core Subarea4C West Downtown Area Downtown Specific Plan, Downtown Under Construction, Core Subarea 2 Mixed Use Residential (Legacy) STAFF ANALYSIS General Plan The project site has a General Plan land use designation of Downtown Area. The Downtown Areaseeks to provide a unique, locally-oriented, pedestrian-friendly shopping environment and the highest residential density in the Downtown. The General Plan states that higher-intensity residential development of a density that will support the predominantly commercial environment is integral to the economic viability of this district. \[Livermore General Plan Land Use Element, p. 3-22\]. The proposal to redevelop the project site with residential uses is consistent with the land use designation and implements the General Plan goals for the Downtown area. 5 9 The project supports policies established in the Land Use Element and the 2015-2022 Housing Element. The Land Use and Housing Elements encourage the provision of housing for all incomes types on infill locations located near transit services. The proposed project would be one hundred percent affordable and would redevelop an existing infill site bounded by urban uses and served by publictransit and public utilities. The site is located within one quarter mile of the Livermore Amador Valley Transit Authority (LAVTA) transit center and within the Downtown core, offering affordable housing near transit services, shopping and job opportunities. Government Code section 65863 (No Net Loss Law) requires a jurisdiction to maintain a sufficient supply of adequate sites in its housing element at all times throughout the housing element planning period to meet a jurisdiction’s remaining unmet share of the Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA) for each income category. If a development is approved at a lower density than what was assumed in the sites inventory of the housing element, No Net Loss Law requires a jurisdiction to make written findings and identify additional site capacity. A lower residential density results from a jurisdiction either approving a development with fewer residential units than was assumed for the site or approving a development with residential units that are affordable to a different income category than the site was assumed to accommodate. The proposed workforce housing project would account for 130 housing units affordable to low, very low, and extremely low-income households. In the City’s 2015-2022 Housing Element, the City included The Livermore Village Site (APN 098-0289-021-00, 098-0289) in its site inventory and projected its capacity as 235 housing units at a low-income affordability level. Based upon the City’s progress towards meeting the RHNA for the 2015-2022 planning period that includes projects approved/entitled that are anticipated to pull building permits, the remaining sites inventory capacity for low income units is 159. This capacity can accommodate the 105 units that would not be constructed on this site that are identified in the Housing Element for the Livermore Village site. A total of 140 units were moved off the Livermore Village site and will now be constructed on Pacific Avenue. Therefore, the City will maintain a sufficient supply of adequate sites in the Housing Element to meet its unmet share of the RHNA and is not required to identify additional sites, consistent with Government Code section 65863. The Community Character Element contains objectives and policies to encourage high quality design that enhances Livermore’s urban design quality, prohibits exterior facades with minimal detailing, and ensures compatibility with existing development. The proposed project achieves these objectives and policies by providing a distinct Santa Barbara architectural style with use of high-quality materials. The exterior façades contain extensive detailing, particularly at corner elements, and the decreased building massing at the site periphery and landscaping promote compatibility with surrounding development. The project also implements policies in the Climate Change Element. For example, the project involves infill redevelopment that will add 130 residential units located within walking 6 10 distance of high frequency transit service, including LAVTA bus routes and the Altamont Corridor Express (ACE) trainstation at the LAVTA Transit Center. The project also complies with City requirements for water conservation and energy efficiency and implements Climate Best Management Practices by providing rooftop solar arraysand all electric appliances. SpecificPlan The project site is located within Subarea 4 – Special Condition Sub-District D of the Downtown Core of the Downtown Specific Plan, which establishes the site’s zoning. The project proposes affordable multifamily housing, consistent with the uses and density allowed in Sub-District D. In order to ensure that the Downtown is the most urban, densely developed part of the City, the Downtown Specific Plan establishes a minimum density of 30 units per acre and a maximum density of 55 units per acre within the Downtown Core, calculated on a project-wide basis. The General Plan allows for residential density to be calculated on a gross acreage basis, incorporating one half of the right-of-way width along the longest project streetfrontage. The gross acreage of the project site, which includes all three proposed parcels, is approximately 2.5 acres. This yields a residential density of 52 units per acre, consistent with the Downtown Specific Plan density range. The Specific Plan also contains development standards that regulate height, setback, and bulk, which are discussed further in the Downtown Design Review section of this report. Policies established in the Downtown Specific Plan include allowing housing at a range of types and densities and focusing on the redevelopment of catalyst sites like the former Lucky’s parcel. In addition, the purpose of the Downtown Core is to revitalize the City’s historic core area as the center of the City of Livermore \[Downtown Specific Plan, Downtown Core p. 1\]. The intent of this Plan Area is to, “promote the continued development and revitalization of the City’s pedestrian-oriented Downtown district that serves as the center of the Livermore Community, its most unique shopping district, and as a neighborhood hub for the residences within and surrounding it. \[Id.\] The project proposes to redevelop the former Lucky’s site with affordable residential units and pedestrian connections to First Street, consistent with Specific Plan policy and the purpose of the Downtown Core district. The proposed multifamily residential use is compatible with existing and proposed uses along Railroad Avenue. Station Square townhomes, Mill Springs apartments, and Legacy apartments are located to the west of the project site and are all residential uses. The planned cultural facilities and public park space contemplated by the City Council’s adopted Downtown Plan provide an appropriate transition from the Eden development to the commercial uses farther east. The combination of uses and pedestrian connectivity implements the Downtown Specific Plan and will provide activity and synergy for the existing and planned uses. 7 11 Subdivision – Vesting Tentative Parcel Map 11186 The new Vesting Tentative Parcel Map (map) willsubdivide the northwest residential parcel into three parcels. The parcels would range from approximately 24,000 to 36,500 square feet in size and would be approximately 360 feet in depth (measured east to west). Each parcel would have a minimum 59-foot street frontage and access to L Street, Railroad Avenue, or Veterans Way, in conformance with subdivision ordinance standards. The north and south parcels would be conveyed to Eden Housing through a Disposition and Development Loan Agreement, to be reviewed separately by the City Council. The middle parcel would be dedicated for Veterans Park, as discussed in the Open Space section of this report. Circulation, Streets, and Traffic The existing street network, including Veterans Way, will serve the new parcels. New driveways provide access to the proposed underground parking garage for the north and south buildings via vehicle ramps on L Street and Railroad Avenue. Both garage areas provide driveways of at least twenty feet in width with approximately nine feet of clear height, in conformance with the Development Code’s parking standards. Project frontage improvements include new curbs, gutters, sidewalks, and street trees. Existing street trees would be removed and replaced along Railroad Avenue and L Street and additional street trees would be added within new wells along the sidewalk, as discussed in the Landscaping section of this report. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant pathways would be provided throughout the project site, allowing for adequate site ingress and egress and providing site connections to the existing Downtown sidewalk network. The southern property line abuts the Veterans Way right-of-way. In order to provide adequate pedestrian access along the southern property boundary and to ensure the entire residential block is completed at the same time, staff recommendsthe following: Recommendation 1: Prior to occupancy, applicant shall complete the pedestrian pathway along Veterans Way for the entire frontage of VTPM 11186 Parcel 3, in accordance with all Engineering standard details and specifications, as approved by the Community Development Department. A project-specific traffic study analyzed the proposal’s additional vehicle trips and its impact on nearby intersections (Fehr and Peers, October 2020). Using the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) trip generation manual multifamily entry, the study concluded the project would generate 62 weekday morning peak hour trips and 75 weekday evening peak hour trips. With these added trips, the Railroad Avenue/Livermore Avenue and Railroad Avenue/L Street intersections will continue to function at acceptable levels of service (measured by seconds of delay per vehicle), as established in the General Plan \[Objective CIR-5.1.P1\]. The traffic study analyzed two different garage entrance configurations, one with a single entrance along L Street and one with a single entrance along Railroad Avenue. The project proposes a driveway on both L Street and Railroad Avenue, an alternative that combines 8 12 the two options that were evaluated in the traffic study. The City’s Traffic Engineer has reviewed the project and found that the traffic study is adequate and its conclusions are valid because the peak hour trips will be split between two locations on different streets, instead of being concentrated at one driveway. The General Plan Circulation Element classifies Railroad Avenue as a Major Street. Major streets are local medium-speed, high-capacity routes (ranging from 20,000 to 50,000 vehicles per day) for intracity, cross-town travel and local access to freeways, highways, and the subregional road system via interchanges and signal-controlled intersections \[Livermore General Plan Circulation Element, p.5-3\].L Street is identified as a Collector Street, which are relatively low-speed, medium-capacity streets (ranging from 5,000 to 20,000 vehicles per day) that facilitate movement between local and major streets \[Id. p.5-4\]. Both streets are capable of handling the project’s added trips. The city’s Traffic Engineer has identified the potential for turning movement conflicts between vehicles turning in and out of the southern building garage and vehicles turning from Veterans Way onto L Street. For this reason, the Engineering – Traffic conditions of approval recommend a right-in/ right-out only configuration for the southern building’s garage entrance. The recommended change will avoid conflicts. In response to California Senate Bill 743, the Governor’s Office of Planning and Research (OPR) updated the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) guidelines to prohibit the use of delay-based metrics (Level of Service) and instead use vehicle miles traveled (VMT) as the basis for analyzing CEQA traffic impacts. Based on OPR screening criteria, one- hundred-percent affordable projects in infill locations are presumed to have a less than significant impact. The proposed project is a one-hundred-percent affordable project located in an infill location and completely surrounded by urban uses. Consistent with OPR Guidelines, the project will have a less than significant impact with respect to VMT generation. The City maintains an Active Transportation Plan (ATP) that inventories existing trails and bike lanes throughout the City and identifies key locations for new bicycle lane and trail segments in order to promote connectivity and encourage use of alternative modes of transportation. The ATP does not identify any bike lane improvements along Railroad Avenue, but it does call for a Class 2B Buffered Bike Lane along the Downtown segment of L Street. However, the ATP identifies the L Street Corridor as a study area warranting future analysis to address potential roadway modifications to accommodate potential ATP and street improvements. Preliminary analysis found substantial restriping and lane reduction was needed to accommodate a buffered bike lane. Consistent with the ATP, staff will conduct a future study of the L Street corridor for future bike enhancements and opportunities for restriping, lane reductions, or right-of-way expansion. 9 13 Parking The project proposes two underground parking garages, one beneath each building footprint, that would be accessed from L Street and Railroad Avenue. The two garages would house 117 total spaces. An additional 16 spaces are proposed within the adjacent and approved L Street Garage, to be constructed approximately 75 feet south of the southern residential building. The underground parking garages would be accessible to residents and resident managers only and would not provide any public parking. The Engineering traffic conditions of approval require signage to be installed at garage entrances to ensure exclusive resident use and to reduce public confusion. In order to provide an adequate number of parking stalls, the north parking garage proposes a mix of standard-size stalls, compact stalls, and a parking lift system. The Downtown Specific Plan allows for up to fifty percent of all parking garage stalls to have a compact width of eight feet. As discussed in the Density Bonus section of this report, the applicant is requesting one hundred percent of the underground parking garage stalls to have an eight-foot width and for 15 stalls to have a reduced 16-foot length (where 18 feet is the standard depth), equivalent in length to compact stalls allowed outside of the Downtown. Thirty-four parking stalls will be provided within a parking lift system inside the northern garage. Nine accessible spaces will be provided, in conformance with Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements. The Specific Plan requires onsite multifamily unit parking at ratios that increase with the number of bedrooms provided, as follows: Studio units: 1 space per unit One-bedroom: 1.5 spaces per unit Two or more bedrooms: 1.75 spaces per unit The project proposes a 1:1 parking ratio and proposes a mix of onsite and offsite resident parking. As discussed in the Density Bonus section of this report, the applicant is requesting parking incentives to allow for reductions in required parking ratios and to allow for offsite unit parking, in conformance with State Density Bonus law pertaining to affordable housing projects. The project conforms to all required guest parking standards. The Downtown Specific Plan requires one guest space per ten multifamily residential units and allows for onsite or offsite guest parking within 600 feet of the project site. The 13 proposed guest spaces within the L Street Garage would be within approximately 75 feet of the southern building and meet the required guest space ratios. The distance from the parking garage to the units would be similar to that of other multifamily developments in the City. Given that the L Street Garage is not yet constructed, and in order to ensure that unit and guest stalls are provided by the time of project completion, staff recommends the following: Recommendation 2: The project will provide resident parking at a ratio of 1:1 by leasing spaces in the L Street Garage. If the L Street garage is not operational by the time of the housing’s lease up, lease up may continue and the Community 10 14 Development Department shall work mutually with Eden to identify and secure temporary parking within 600 feet of the project site. Eighty bike parking stalls would be provided onsite, with 54 stalls in the north building and 26 stalls in the south building, exceeding Development Code requirements. Bike parking would be provided within ground floor bike lounges in the north and south building and a dedicated bike storage area in the northern building parking garage. Each storage area would have exterior access to sidewalks, providing connections to existing bike lane and street networks. In addition, the bike lounges are easily accessed and well distributed throughout the project site. Utilities, Services, and Public Infrastructure The existing public utility easements, created by the previously approved Vesting Tentative Tract Map 8574 and subsequently recorded Final Tract Map 84574 (collectively, the Recorded Map) for the Downtown Core site, would be vacated and replaced with new public utility easements along the southern and eastern property boundaries with mapping of Vesting Tentative Parcel Map 11186 (the Proposed Map). The existing Railroad Avenue Right-of-Way dedication created by the Recorded Map will be removed with the Proposed Map because the proposed bus-turnout is no longer needed on the project frontage. Both residential parcels would be served with all necessary public utilities, including electricity and telecommunications, as required by the City’s subdivision ordinance \[LDC 10.05.040\]. Existing utilities and infrastructure serving the site have sufficient capacity to accommodate the incremental increase. Emergency vehicle access would be provided from Railroad Avenue, L Street, Veterans Way, and the extension of K Street along the eastern project boundary. The Fire Department has reviewed and approved of the proposed plans and has conditioned the project to ensure adequate ladder access to upper floors and adequate fire hydrant placement around the site. The Downtown Specific Plan states that trash and recycling bins should be provided with architectural enclosures or fencing, sited in unobtrusive locations, and screened by landscaping \[DSP Ch.6, p. 6-82\]. The project complies with this guideline by placing bins inside secure interior trash rooms. The project proposes three trash chutes for each floor leading to one central trash collection room on the ground floor of each apartment building. The chutes would serve all three waste streams (trash, recyclables, and organic waste) in conformance with the Development Code \[LDC 6.03.130\]. Trash bins and carts would be staged at the northeast corner of the site for pickup by the City’s solid waste franchisee, Livermore Sanitation. Trash trucks would access the staging area via the Emergency Vehicle Access lane along the eastern property boundary. In order to ensure trash pickup would not conflict with regular Downtown operations nor resident activities and that all trash facilities remain in working order, staff recommends the following: Recommendation 3: Bins and carts for all waste streams (trash, recyclables, and organics) shall remain inside the designated trash rooms unless staged at the 11 15 designated staging area for pickup. Upon pickup, all bins and carts shall be promptly returned to the designated trash rooms. Recommendation 4: Trash, recyclable, and organic pickupshall occur prior to 8:00 am, or as authorized by the Community Development Department Director. Recommendation 5: Maintenance and cleaning of each trash room, trash chute, and trash staging area is the responsibility of the manager or owner of the premises. Trash chutes, rooms, and the staging area shall be maintained in clean operable conditions. Trash chutesshall be lined with galvanized steel on all sides and doors. The applicant has coordinated with Livermore Sanitation to ensure the proposed trash management plan is functional and efficient. The Engineering Conditions require the applicant to complete the hardscape area along the eastern property boundary. Required improvements include installation of new curb, gutter, and sidewalk, grading and paving of the emergency vehicle access lane, and installation of a rolled curb and keycard-actuated retractable bollards at the Railroad Avenue approach. The rolled curb and retractable bollards would prevent cut through traffic on the EVA, but would still allow fire and trash truck access. These improvements also ensure the project is in conformance with the Council’s adopted Downtown Core Plan, that calls for emergency vehicle access and hardscape between the housing site and the cultural facilities to the east, and ensure the site is adequately served by fire and trash service. To ensure fire and trash service is provided by occupancy, and to ensure its design is compatible with the Downtown, staff recommends the following: Recommendation 6: Prior to occupancy, emergency vehicle access lane along the eastern property boundary shall be graded and paved to the satisfaction of the City Engineer. Recommendation 7: As part of the Building Permit submittal, theapplicant shall submit a design for retractable bollards at the north and south entrances to the EVA that connects Veteran’s Way with Railroad Avenue. The design shall be consistent with the Downtown Specific Plan Design Standards and Guidelinesand shallbe subject to review and approval by the Community Development Department. Gradingand Soils The applicant has provided a grading plan and the City provided existing soil and hazards reports for the site. The site is relatively flat and had been previously graded to accommodate a temporary parking lot. Proposed landscaping areas would generally slope away from building foundations and towards the street and stormwater retention areas. The City Engineer has found the grading plan to meet all City grading standards. Since April 2020, the City has been working with the State of California’s San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board to appropriately implement site cleanup so that it is 12 16 suitable for residential uses. The site assessment, regulatory oversite, and site cleanup is consistent with the Mitigation, Monitoring, and Reporting Program (MMRP) adopted with the certified 2009 Subsequent DSP EIR (SCH: 2008092085). The MMRP identified mitigation measures to ensure site hazards were reduced to a less than significant impact. The City will continue to implement the 2009 Subsequent DSP EIR and will work with the Water Board and all necessary state agencies to properly remediate and mitigate the site prior to residential uses occupying the site. Downtown Design Review The Downtown Specific Plan establishes residential development standards that regulate height, setbacks, and bulk and design standards and guidelines that regulate design for all sites with the plan area. The project complies with the development standards for the Downtown Core, Subarea 4 – Special Condition Sub-district D area and the residential Design Standards and Guidelines as described below. Development Standards Development DSP Standard Proposed Analysis Criteria DSP Ch. 4 Downtown Core Height Minimum Complies The development will be four floors in height and exceeds the height Minimum 2 floors/20 feet minimum required building height. (§4.1.B) Maximum Maximum height up to four (4) The project will be a maximum of four floors and 49 feet at the Complies height for floors/fifty- five (55) feet, roof ridge of the south building. The north building is slightly “Downtown provided the fourth floor does shorter at 47 feet to the chimney element. The eaves of both Specific Plan not extend for more than 60% buildings will be set at 40 feet. The fourth floors of the north and Catalyst of the site frontage along L south buildings occupy approximately 33 percent of the catalyst Project Site Street, Railroad Avenue and project site frontage along L Street, Railroad Avenue, and (former South Livermore AvenueSouth Livermore Avenue when taken as a whole. Lucky’s site)” (§4.1.D.5.e) Setbacks Residential Thesmallest setback is three feet. Complies The required setback ranges Street from zero to twenty feet. Frontage Setback (§5.1.B) Non-Street No minimum side or rear The east setback is ten feet. Complies Frontage setback. (§5.2 and 5.3) The maximum side setback is 10 feet but can be larger to accommodate driveways and pedestrian pathways. These standards apply to the eastern property line. 13 17 Development DSP StandardProposedAnalysis Criteria DSP Ch. 4 Downtown Core Site Development Driveway The Specific Plan allows one The project will haveone two-way curb cut per approximately Complies Access (§6.2) two-way curb cut per 150 feet 465 feet of street frontage. Each driveway will be twenty feet of street frontage. wide. Driveways are proposed along L Street and Railroad The maximum allowable curb Avenue. cut width is 24 feet for two- way driveways. Service Service access must be from Service access will be provided on the only interior lot line Complies Access (§6.2) alleys and rear parking areas (eastern property line) via an emergency vehicle access lane. whenever possible. Adequate The lane is of a sufficient width to accommodate solid waste access for garbage, recycling, and emergency vehicles. food waste collection vehicles, and emergency vehicles must be provided. Open Space Instead of maintaining lot coverage standards, and to provide additional greenspace in the Downtown, the Downtown Specific Plan requires public and private open space to be incorporated into each development project \[DSP. Chapter 5. Downtown Core Plan Area. 6.3\]. Residential projects are required to provide open space at the following ratios: Public Open Space: 150 square feet per unit Private Open Space: 60 square feet per unit The development will provide approximately 0.7 acres of publicly accessible open space on the project site as Veterans Park. Veterans Parkwill occupy a separate parcel and will be dedicated on the Parcel Map as part of this project (Attachment 4, Sheet 2). Although the dedication is occurring with this project, the final park design will be approved at a future date and will include a mix of landscape, hardscape, site furnishings, a children’s play area, and tree, shrub, and turf areas, in accordance with the City Council’s adopted 2018 Downtown Core Plan and the Downtown Concept Plan Design Guidelines. At a proposed area of 240 square feet per unit, the area of Veterans Park exceeds the DSP’s public open space requirements. The project also exceeds the required private open space requirements, with 68 square feet per unit. Private open space will be provided in a mix of locations, including an open courtyard and terrace along the north building, a play area, open terrace and porch area along the south building, and open decks on both buildings. All private open space meets the required minimum dimensions specified in the Downtown Specific Plan and will be exclusive to the residents of the project. In addition, private open space is equally distributed between both buildings. 14 18 Security, Lighting, and Noise The Livermore Police Department has reviewed the application and the project is conditioned to conform with the security section of the Livermore Municipal Code (e.g. window and door lock design, entry vision areas, etc.). To ensure all private open space areas and garage space is safe for residents during hours of darkness, staff recommends the following: Recommendation 8: The construction drawings shall include a photometric plan that demonstrates adequate site lighting. Parking garages shall maintain a minimum light level of one foot-candle at the parking surface. Pathways and private open space areas shall be sufficiently illuminated for safety, but respectful of the residential context. The project is located within the Downtown Specific Plan. In order to recognize and protect the variety of existing vibrant uses within the Downtown area, including commercial, cultural, and recreational, and to promote ongoing communications between neighboring property owners and tenants, the Livermore Municipal Code requires all property owners, tenants, and users of property within the Downtown Specific Plan to be notified of the existing Downtown environment and its potential impacts \[LMC section 8.19\]. For this reason, staff recommends the following: Recommendation 9: Prior to occupancy, property owner shall record the deed notification provided in LMC section 8.19.050, concerning Notice of Right to Downtown Operations, on the property for which this development permit is issued. Although the project could be impacted by existing uses in and around the Downtown area, including noise impacts, the DSP does require interior noise levels to be limited in order to provide for the health and wellbeing of Livermore’s residents \[DSP. Chapter 5. 7.2\]. For this reason, staff also recommends the following: Recommendation 10: The project shall demonstrate a maximum interior decibel rating of 45 dBA with windows closed, assuming 85 dBA on the first floor and an exterior noise level of 75 dBA. If noise analysis assumes closed windows 100% of the time, a fresh air ventilation system must be utilized. Building Massing and Siting Both the north and south buildings of the proposed project will be four stories in height, which is similar to proposed development to the south and west. Both the Legacy apartments buildings and the L Street parking garage will be four stories in height along L Street. The L Street roadway, adjoining sidewalks, building setbacks, and double-rows of tree planting on both sides of L Street provide a buffered 95-foot separation between the Legacy Apartments and the Eden housing community. Together, the two residential developments combined with Veteran’s Park will create an active and attractive streetscape as envisioned by the Downtown Specific Plan. 15 19 The Eden building heights step down to three stories along the eastern façade to transition to the future two-story cultural facilities and the existing single-story commercial structures of Blacksmith Square that front Railroad Avenue and South Livermore Avenue. The southern Eden building includes a single-story community space and open porch at the northeast corner of the building. This feature, combined with the building detailing, creates an attractive pedestrian interface with the park and plaza between the cultural facilities. The Downtown Specific Plan Design Standards and Guidelines establish requirements and guidelines to reduce multifamily residential building bulk. To this end, the DSP requires multifamily buildings to be dividedinto sections with distinct building volumes by: 1) architecturally subdividing buildings into 50-foot segments; 2) creating distinguishing vertical modules; 3) accentuating the ground floor or reducing upper floor bulk; and 4) emphasizing building corners with distinct features \[DSP section 6.32-6.34\]. The proposed design includes facades with horizontal plane changes at regular intervals, and vertical modules do not exceed 50 feet in width. Each vertical module is differentiated by offsetting color combinations and accompanied with vertical plane changes in the roof form. In this way, the north and south buildings provide extensive architectural relief that casts shadows and adds visual interest to each façade. In addition, the ground floor is accentuated by thicker window sills, additional window surround detailing, a darker color, and a smaller first floor setback at key architectural intervals. The first floor is also accentuated by shed roofs and porch elements. With these features, the buildings read as being firmly supported by the first floor, adding a sense of grounding to the design and functionally pulling the building’s bulk toward the ground plane, consistent with the Design Standards and Guidelines. The building corners, particularly in prominent locations, are extensively articulated and detailed. For example, the western elevation of the northern building provides a cantilevered second-story projection with braces beneath to accentuate this highly visible building façade. In conjunction with the projection, the building corner steps back to create a more deeply articulated façade. Roof forms are also varied at the corners, producing a mix of gable and hip roofs that serve to break up the fourth-floor massing, consistent with the Design Standards and Guidelines. Both buildings utilize hip roofs across all facades to lower the wall plane height and deemphasize the fourth floor, reducing building bulk. Both buildings have reduced heights along their eastern facades, dropping to three stories, in order to promote compatibility with the adjacent cultural uses. The southern building reduces its massing further along the eastern façade by providing a single-story covered walk adjacent to the community room. This element adds detail and improves the building’s pedestrian interface with the adjacent park. The buildings also employ minimal setbacks and are aligned with street frontages. In this way, the buildings reinforce continuous public streets and pathway spaces, in conformance with the Design Standards and Guidelines. The entire Downtown Core site creates a natural stair-step pattern from east to west with ascending heights separated by setbacks and landscaping. The one- and two-story 16 20 development and outdoor patios along First Street will be approximately 250 feet to the south and will be separated by the L Street parking garage. In addition, the Eden housing project will provide parking in underground garages and within the L Street garage, ensuring the ground plane is not occupied by surface lots and instead reserved for open space and pathways, increasing the walkability, pedestrian scale, and pleasant nature of the Downtown Core area. Architecture, Colors, and Materials The project proposes a richly detailed Santa Barbara architectural style that incorporates design features and materials that distinguish the project while complementing other traditional buildings styles in Downtown Livermore. The Specific Plan calls for architecture that conveys Livermore’s architectural heritage in terms of material, color, proportion, window type, and overall composition \[DSP section 6-37\]. The proposed Spanish Eclectic architectural style is represented in Downtown Livermore’s historic character in the Forester’s Hall, the Livermore Post Office, and the Veteran’s Memorial Building. The proposed design effectively adapts the traditional design elements found in these buildings. It is also compatible with the Spanish Revival styling of the recently approved Legacy apartments project to the west of the project site across L Street. The Design Standards and Guidelines call for authentic materials, like brick, wood, or stucco, to be used on building surfaces \[DSP section 6-40\] The project proposes a rich palette of materials, including smooth stucco walls, Spanish s-tile roofing, standing seam accent roof material, Spanish tiling, and iron window grills, in conformance with Specific Plan requirements. Each building includes extensive detailing, including large eave overhangs along Veterans Way, Railroad Avenue, and Veterans Park. Exposed rafter tails, corbels, Spanish tiles, metal water catches, light sconces along the first floor, gable end scalloping, belt courses, and coffering accentuate the exterior, consistent with Specific Plan guidelines. Taken together, the details create building facades that are high quality, distinctive, and serve to further break down the building’s massing towards a pedestrian scale. The building’s fenestration promotes order and variety, with consistent window sill lines, but varied window design, width, and sill details. A majority of windows employ muntins to simulate divided lights, are vertically proportioned, and are recessed into building walls, consistent with the Design Standards and Guidelines. Building colors are varied and compatible with the architectural style. The plan set notes gray and white primary colors with a blue accent color for entrance doors (Attachment 4, Sheet A.19). Both the building base and alternating vertical modules utilize the darker gray color, ensuring visual variety and helping to ground the building. In conformance with the Specific Plan, the proposed color palette is compatiblewith existing earth tones used along first street and in the Downtown Core and northside neighborhood districts \[DSP. 6-46\]. The Specific Plan requires that all rooftop equipment is screened fully from public view. The project proposes rooftop mechanical equipment wells inboard of the hip roofs. However, no 17 21 mechanical plans were provided showing mechanical curb and unit heights. For this reason, staff recommends the following: Recommendation 11: All rooftop mechanical equipment shall be fully screened from public view. Overall, the proposed architecture implements the Downtown Specific Plan, is compatible with the Downtown’s existing visual fabric, and is richly detailed. For these reasons, staff supports the design as proposed. Landscape The project’s landscape plan includes a mixture of street trees, onsite shade and accent trees, shrubs, grasses, and groundcovers. A majority of the plant palette includes California natives and pollinator plants that are conducive to birds, butterfly, and beneficial insects like bees. In this way, the plant selection will be well suited to Livermore’s climate and will promote increased biodiversity. The Specific Plan recommends full headed shade trees, greenery, and brightly colored flowering materials to add to the overall impression of Livermore \[DSP section 6-87\]. The plant palette includes broad branching trees like Zelkova, accent trees with color like Western Red Bud, and a host of flowering and scented shrubs like Lilac, Lavender, Penstemon, and Fuchsia. Groundcovers include soft to the touch surfaces like Blue Oat Grass and Creeping Sage, suitable for families and areas in close proximity to the public (Attachment 4, Sheet L105). Large ornamental shrubs would be planted at building corners and in raised planter beds along the building base, adding visual variety, color, and a visual transition from public to private space. The Specific Plan recommends dense plantings of street trees to increase the buffer between the buildings and the road \[DSP Ch. 7, p. 23\]. Street trees also provide an attractive and safer pedestrian environment. The landscape plan proposes double-rows of trees along L Street and Railroad Avenue street frontages to promote sidewalk shading and building screening. Street trees include Japanese Zelkova, Southern Live Oak, and Chinese Elm (Attachment 4, Sheet L104). Each tree offers a broad head and high branching canopy suitable for shading and screening, as described in the table below(source: Sunset Western Garden Book): Street Tree LocationHeight at Spread at Type Growth Rate Maturity Maturity Japanese Building 60+ feet 60+ feet Deciduous Medium (1-2 ft/yr) Zelkova Corners Southern Railroad 40-80 feet 80-160Evergreen Medium (1-2 ft/yr) Live Oak Avenue feet Chinese L Street 40-60 feet 50-70 feet Deciduous Fast (2+ft/yr) Elm 18 22 The proposed street trees are a mix of deciduous and evergreen trees, ensuring greenery during winter months and open views into the project site. Although unlikely to reach full height and spread at maturity given their location adjacent to streets and sidewalks, the trees will provide large canopies for screening and shading, improving the L Street and Railroad Avenue streetscapes. In addition, the street trees will match those of the adjacent Legacy project, promoting streetscape consistency and creating a boulevard appearance. All street trees along L Street and Railroad Avenue will be placed in tree wells within the public sidewalk. In order to ensure design consistency across the Downtown Core, and to prevent public infrastructure damage, staff recommends the following: Recommendation 12: All street tree wells shall be compatible in design to existing Downtown tree wells, employing similar design features like grates or coverings. Recommendation 13: All trees adjacent to public infrastructure shall use control features like root barriers and engineered soils to prevent infrastructure damage. Chitalpas trees are proposed along the southern property boundary, which would line the north side of the proposed Veterans Way walkway (additional Chitalpas trees would be planted along the south side of the walkway in conjunction with L Street Garage construction). Chitalpas are flowering deciduous trees that are suitable for drier climates. The double row of Chitalpas trees would create a visually pleasant and shaded walking experience for pedestrians. The overall street tree plan would provide a mix of trees that would produce an attractive, pleasant, and shaded streetscape, consistent with the Specific Plan. The landscape plan also includes plantings within private open spaces like the terraces and the northern building’s courtyard, providing shade, interest, and contemplative areas for building residents. The landscape plans are conditioned to comply with the City’s Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance (WELO) in order to conserve water, avoid invasive species, and ensure irrigation efficiency. The project site is also within the existing Downtown Landscape Maintenance District andwillcontinue to be assessed in accordance with the District. The proposed trees and shrubs will create a welcoming and comfortable outdoor space and are consistent with the DSP Design Standards and Guidelines, staff supports the proposed landscape plan. Affordable Housing Affordability As in the greater Bay Area region, there is an urgent and significant need for affordable housing in Livermore. Currently, there are approximately 13,000 households on the Livermore Housing Authority’s ‘Housing Choice Voucher Program’ waitlist and approximately 120 children who attend LVJUSD schools experiencing homelessness. The 42 Chestnut Square affordable family apartments received approximately 3,000 household applications in 2020. In support of the City Council's priority to increase and expand 19 23 affordable housing opportunities, Livermore currently has over 360 affordable units in the City's development pipeline. The proposed project includes 130 affordable units, representing 100 percent of the project total, that range from one to three bedrooms. These units will be available for households making between 20 and 60 percent of the Alameda County Area Median Income (AMI). In 2020, Alameda County’s AMI for a household size of four was $119,200. The state of California classifies households at 20 to 60 percent AMI as extremely low, very low, and low income. Based on their salary ranges, residents with the following jobs would qualify: Police Department assistants, School District receptionists, emergency medical technicians, and retail and restaurant employees working in the Downtown. Density Bonus The State of California encourages the production of affordable housing through its Density Bonus statute \[California Government Code Section 65915-65918\]. These provisions allow for increased project densities and developer incentives for development projects that provide a certain percentage of affordable units. These provisions are implemented by Livermore Development Code section 6.02.030. For projects that contain 80 percent low and 20 percent medium income units, the developer receives up to four developer incentives that may waive certain development standards of the underlying zoning district, like setbacks, lot coverage, and parking ratios. The reductions or modifications granted as incentives must result in identifiable, financially sufficient, and actual cost reduction. The applicant is not seeking an increase in the allowed density, given that the project complies with the density allowed by the Downtown Specific Plan. However, the applicant is seeking one developer incentive related to parking, as follows: Developer Incentive One: Parking 1. Offsite unit parking location (in L Street garage) 2. Reduction in unit parking space quantity (to 1:1 ratio) 3. Reduction in compact parking space dimension (from 18 feet to 16 feet depth) 4. Reduction standard parking space width (from 8.5 to 8.0 feet) According to State Density Bonus law, the City shall grant developer incentives for affordable housing projects unless the following findings are made \[Government Code Section 65915 (d)(1)\]: 1. The concession or incentive does not resultin identifiable and actual cost reductions, consistent with subdivision (k),to provide for affordable housing costs, as defined in Section 50052.5 of the Health and Safety Code, or for rents for the targeted units to be set as specified in subdivision (c). Findings: The requested parking incentive to reduce the required number of spaces required onsite and to reduce the required parking dimensions will result in 20 24 identifiable, financially sufficient, and actual cost reduction. The parcel size, desired number of affordable units, and Downtown Specific Plan standards necessitate subgrade parking garages beneath the footprint of each building. Based on current market conditions, subgrade parking stalls cost approximately $65,000 each. The Downtown Specific Plan requires 231 parking stalls, including both unit and guest parking, resulting in a project parking cost of approximately $15 million. The reduction in parking stall dimensions, reduction in required number of stalls, and allowance for offsite parking would reduce the parking burden on the applicant and result in real savings of approximately $6.5 million. For these reasons, the parking incentive does result in identifiable and actual cost reductions. 2. The developer incentives would have a specific adverse impact, as defined in paragraph (2) of Subdivision (d) of Section 65589.5, upon public health and safety or the physical environment or an any real property that is listed in the California Register of Historical Resources and for which there is no feasible method to satisfactorily mitigate or avoid the specific adverse impact without rendering the development unaffordable to low- and moderate-income households. Findings: The Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) publishes a Parking Generation Manual that identifies peak parking demand for different land uses throughout the United States. In its demand calculations, the manual accounts for the circulation of vehicles and inefficiencies in unassigned parking areas. Assuming reserved parking spaces, the project traffic and parking study (Fehr and Peers, October 2020) concludes the project would generate a peak parking demand of approximately 129 spaces for the 130 dwelling units. Therefore, based on ITE manual data, a 1:1 parking ratio is sufficient. In addition, the applicant provided data regarding similar Eden Housing developments with comparable unit sizes and unit mixes. In each of the four comparables, parking ratios were 1:1 or less. Therefore, existing Eden developments have demonstrated a 1:1 parking ratio is sufficient. In order to ensure a sufficient stall quantity per the ITE analysis, staff recommends the following: Recommendation 14: Each onsite parking stall shall be numbered and assigned to each residential unit within the development.Residents shall be made aware of parking stall assignments. With the project condition regarding stall numbering, the developer incentive to reduce parking ratios would not adversely affect public health and safety. In addition, no impact would occur on the physical environment nor historical resources. 3.The developer incentives would be contrary to State or Federal law. Findings: Parking stall size and quantities are required by local ordinance. The parking reduction incentive would not violate any State or Federal law. 21 25 Given that none of the findings above can be made, the City shall grant the requested parking incentive to the project applicant. Staff supports the proposed parking incentive given that it provides real project savings and will not endanger the public health and safety or the environment. Sustainability In support of the City’s General Plan and Climate Action Plan, the proposed project will incorporate sustainability measures into its construction and operations. For example, the project proposes rooftop photovoltaic arrays that would provide enough electricity to cover the energy consumption of all common areas like hallways, lobbies, and garages. In addition, the project would be all electric and does not propose new gas fixtures. Garages would be outfitted with five electric vehicle charging stations, allowing for residents to more easily use and charge electric vehicles. The project includes organic waste and recycling chutes for all floors to encourage composting and recycling activities for all residents. All onsite fixtures would be water and energy efficient and building materials would be sustainably sourced. As such, the buildings would receive Greenpoint ratings, similar to LEED certification, for their efficiency and low energy use. Finally, the project is an infill development located near grocery and personal services and within one quarter mile of transit services like bus and rail. Thus, residents have walking access to daily needs and more efficient forms of transportation, providing more options and potentially reducing their reliance on personal automobiles. With these measures and characteristics in place, the project would reduce its carbon footprint, decrease its water and energy use, and be within walking distance of essential services, ultimately increasing the development’s sustainability. PUBLIC COMMENT A range of Livermore, Tri-Valley, and Bay Area housing, anti-poverty, and environmental organizations have expressed project support, including the Livermore Housing Authority, the Tri-Valley Anti-PovertyCollaborative, East Bay Housing Organizations, and Greenbelt Alliance. Letters of support can be found in Attachment 5. ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINATION The proposed project is exempt from review under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) pursuant to Government Code Section 65457 and CEQA Guidelines Section 15182 (c), which exempts residential projects that implement a Specific Plan where: 1) a public agency has prepared an EIR on a Specific Plan after January 1, 1980 and the residential project conforms to the Specific Plan; and 2) no events described in CEQA Guidelines Section 15162 have occurred. 1. Findings: The Downtown Specific Plan and EIR were initially adopted and certified in 2004, with a Downtown Specific Plan Amendment and subsequent EIR adopted and certified in 2009, and three addenda adopted in March 2019, August 25th 2020, and August 27th 2020, respectively. The project is consistent with the 22 26 allowed residential and park uses of the Specific Plan’s Subarea 4 – Special Condition Sub-district D, as analyzed in the addenda. The project does not exceed the site’s allowed density of 55 dwelling units per acre and conforms with all required development standards with respect to setbacks, height, open space, and parking upon making the findings precedent to granting the requested density bonus incentive. The project implements Specific Plan policies that seek to redevelop the project site (former Lucky’s parcel), revitalize the Downtown, and provide a range of housing types The project shall comply with the Mitigation, Monitoring, and Reporting Program (MMRP) adopted with the certified 2009 Subsequent DSP EIR (SCH: 2008092085). The City continues to work with the Regional Water Quality Control Board to implement site cleanup consistent with the MMRP. For these reasons, the residential project implements the Downtown Specific Plan, which had an EIR prepared and certified after 1980. 2. Findings: No substantial changes are proposed which would require major revisions to the previous EIR, subsequent EIR, or addenda. The project proposes 130 residential units and park dedication, consistent with the allowed uses and densities contemplated in the EIR and addenda. Substantial changes in circumstances have not occurred requiring major revisions to the previous EIR, subsequent EIR, or addenda, as the site remains vacant and used for temporary parking and the site context remains heavily urbanized in the City’s core. There is no new information of substantial importance that would result in new impacts not previously discussed, result in more severe impacts, or require modifications to the existing mitigation measures. For these reasons, no events described in CEQA Section 15162 have occurred and therefore no further environmental review is required. RECOMMENDATION Staff recommends the Planning Commission adopt the attached Resolutions, recommendingthe City Council: 1. Adopt a resolution finding that the project is exempt under the California Environmental Quality Act in accordance with CEQA Guidelines Sections 15182 (c), and approving Downtown Design Review 20-019 and Vesting Tentative Parcel Map 11186 - Subdivision 21-003, subject to the attached Conditions of Approval. 2. Instruct staff to file a Notice of Exemption, in accordance with the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act, if the project is approved. ATTACHMENTS 1. Resolution (CEQA) 2. Resolution (Project) 3. Conditions of Approval 4. Development Plans 5. Letters of Support 23 27 IN THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF LIVERMORE STATE OF CALIFORNIA A RESOLUTION RECOMMENDING A FINDING THAT THE PROJECT IS EXEMPT UNDER THE CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT Downtown Design Review (DDR) 20-019 and Vesting Tentative Parcel Map (VTPM) 11186 –Subdivision (SUB) 21-003 Hearing to consider a request for Downtown Design Review and Vesting Tentative Parcel Map to develop the western portion of the Downtown Core site (formerly Livermore Village) with the affordable housing component of the Downtown Plan approved by the City Council on January 29, 2018. The development consists of 130 affordable residential units in two four-story buildings with underground parking. The development would include one, two, and three-bedroom units affordable to individuals and families within 20% to 60% of the Alameda County Area Median Income, landscaping, stormwater, frontage improvements, private open space, dedication of approximately 0.7 acres for a public park, and a temporary emergency vehicle access. The design of the public park is to be considered at a future date. Locat ion: Southeast corner of Railroad Avenue and South L Street (APN: 98-289-21-1) The City received an application from Eden Housing for Downtown Design Review (DDR) 20-019 and Vesting Tentative Parcel Map (VTPM) 11186 – Subdivision (SUB) 21- 003 to authorize the affordable housing component of the Downtown Plan approved by the City Council on January 29, 2018. At its duly noticed meeting on April 20, 2021, the Planning Commission considered in public hearings the proposals, staff recommendations, public testimony, and findings. NOW, THEREFORE, with respect to theCalifornia Environmental Quality Act, the Planning Commission finds based upon the information presented that: The proposed project is exempt from review under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) pursuant to Government Code Section 65457 and CEQA Guidelines Section 15182 (c), whichexempts residential projects that implement a Specific Plan where: 1) a public agency has prepared an EIR on a Specific Plan after January 1, 1980 and the residential project conforms to the Specific Plan; and 2) no events described in CEQA Guidelines Section 15162 have occurred. 1.Findings: The Downtown Specific Plan and EIR were initially adopted and certified in 2004, with a Downtown Specific Plan Amendment and subsequent EIR adopted and certified in 2009, and three addenda adopted in March 2019, August 25th 2020, and August 27th 2020, respectively. The project is consistent with the allowed residential -1-Resolution No. 28 and park uses of the Specific Plan’s Subarea 4 – Special Condition Sub-district D, as analyzed in the addenda. The project does not exceed the site’s allowed density of 55 dwelling units per acre and conforms with all required development standards with respect to setbacks, height, open space, and parking upon making the findings precedent to granting the requested density bonus incentive. The project implements Specific Plan policies that seek to redevelop the project site (former Lucky’s parcel), revitalize the Downtown, and provide a range of housing types The project shall comply with the Mitigation, Monitoring, and Reporting Program (MMRP) adopted with the certified 2009 Subsequent DSP EIR (SCH: 2008092085). The City continues to work with the Regional Water Quality Control Board to implement site cleanup consistent with the MMRP. For these reasons, the residential project implements the Downtown Specific Plan, which had an EIR prepared and certified after 1980. 2. Findings: No substantial changes are proposed which would require major revisions to the previous EIR, subsequent EIR, or addenda. The project proposes 130 residential units and park dedication, consistent with the allowed uses and densities contemplated in the EIR and addenda. Substantial changes in circumstances have not occurred requiring major revisions to the previous EIR, subsequent EIR, or addenda, as the site remains vacant and used for temporary parking and the site context remains heavily urbanized in the City’s core. There is no new information of substantial importance that would result in new impacts not previously discussed, result in more severe impacts, or require modifications to the existing mitigation measures. For these reasons, no events described in CEQA Section 15162 have occurred and therefore no further environmental review is required. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Livermore Planning Commission, based on the above findings which are necessary to protect the public health, safety, and general welfare, recommends the City Council find the Project exempt from review under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) pursuant to Government Code Section 65457 and CEQA Guidelines Sections 15182 (c), residential projects consistent with a Specific Plan. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Livermore Planning Commission recommends that the City Council direct staff to file a Notice of Exemption, if the Project is approved. The documents that constitute the record of proceedings upon which this decision is based can be found in the Community Development Department, 1052 S. Livermore Avenue, in Livermore, California. On the motion by Commissioner ____________________, seconded by Commissioner ____________________, the foregoing Resolution was adopted at the Planning Commission meeting of April 20, 2021, by the following vote: AYES: NOES: ABSENT: -2- Resolution No. 29 Jacob Anderson, Chairperson by Steve Stewart, Planning Manager Secretary to the Planning Commission -3- Resolution No. 30 IN THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF LIVERMORE STATE OF CALIFORNIA A RESOLUTION RECOMMENDING APPROVAL Downtown Design Review (DDR) 20-019 and Vesting Tentative Parcel Map (VTPM) 11186 –Subdivision (SUB) 21-003 Hearing to consider a request for Downtown Design Review and Vesting Tentative Parcel Map to develop the western portion of the Downtown Core site (formerly Livermore Village) with the affordable housing component of the Downtown Plan approved by the City Council on January 29, 2018. The development consists of 130 affordable residential units in two four-story buildings with underground parking. The development would include one, two, and three-bedroom units affordable to individuals and families within 20% to 60% of the Alameda County Area Median Income, landscaping, stormwater, frontage improvements, private open space, dedication of approximately 0.7 acres for a public park, and a temporary emergency vehicle access. The design of the public park is to be considered at a future date. Location: Southeast corner of Railroad Avenue and South L Street (APN: 98-289-21-1) The C ity received an application from Eden Housing for Downtown Design Review (DDR) 20-019 and Vesting Tentative Parcel Map (VTPM) 11186 – Subdivision (SUB) 21- 003 to authorize the affordable housing component of the Downtown Plan approved by the City Council on January 29, 2018. The applicant requested one Developer Incentive in accordance with Government Code Section 65915. Since none of the findings set forth in Government Code Section 65915(d)(1) can be made, the City is required to grant the Developer Incentive related to parking. At its duly noticed meeting on April 20, 2021, the Planning Commission considered in public hearings the proposals, staff recommendations, public testimony, and findings. On April 20, 2021, the Planning Commission adopted a resolution finding the Project to be exempt from the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). NOW , THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, with respect to the Downtown Design Review application, the Planning Commission finds based upon the information presented that: 1.The pr oject is in conformance with the Specific Plan's standards and guidelines. Findings: The project site is located within Subarea 4 – Special Condition Sub-district D of the Downtown Core of the Downtown Specific Plan. The project proposes -1-Resolution No. xx-xx 31 affordable multifamily housing that does not exceed 120 percent of the area median income for Alameda County, and a public park, consistent with the uses allowed in Sub-district D. In order to ensure that the Downtown is the most urban, densely developed part of the City, the Downtown Specific Plan establishes a minimum density of 30 units per acre and a maximum density of 55 units per acre within the Downtown Core, calculated on a project-wide basis. The gross acreage of the project site, which includes all three proposed parcels, is approximately 2.5 acres, which equates to a residential density of 52 units per acre, consistent with the Downtown Specific Plan. Policies established in the Downtown Specific Plan include allowing housing at a range of types and densities and focusing on the redevelopment of catalyst sites like the former Lucky’s parcel. In addition, the purpose of the Downtown Core is to revitalize the City’s historic core area as the center of the City of Livermore \[Downtown Specific Plan, Downtown Core p. 1\]. The intent of this Plan Area is to, “promote the continued development and revitalization of the City’s pedestrian- oriented Downtown district that serves as the center of the Livermore Community, its most unique shopping district, and as a neighborhood hub for the residences within and surrounding it. \[Id.\] The project proposes to redevelop the former Lucky’s site with affordable residential units and pedestrian connections to First Street, consistent with Specific Plan policy and the purpose of the Downtown Core district. The project also conforms to all of the Downtown Core development standards with respect to setbacks, height, and open space. The project will dedicate an approximately 0.7-acre public park, exceeding the site’s the public open space requirements. The Specific Plan’s Design Standards and Guidelines call for varied massing, high quality architecture, and substantial landscaping. The proposed design includes facades with horizontal plane changes at regular intervals, vertical modules, extensively articulated and detailed building corners, a grounded first floor, and minimal streetside setbacks to reinforce continuous public streets and pathway space. The architectural style is a richly detailed Santa Barbara design that incorporates features and materials that distinguish the project while complementing other traditional building styles in Downtown Livermore. Each building includes extensive detailing, including large eave overhangs along Veterans Way, Railroad Avenue, and Veterans Park. Exposed rafter tails, corbels, Spanish tiles, metal water catches, light sconces along the first floor, gable end scalloping, belt courses, and coffering accentuate the exterior. The project’s landscape plan includes a mixture of street trees, onsite trees, shrubs and grasses, and groundcovers. A majority of the plant palette includes California natives and pollinator plants that are conducive to birds, butterfly, and beneficial insects like bees. The proposed street trees are a mix of deciduous and evergreen trees, ensuring greenery during winter months and open views into the project site. The proposed trees and shrubs would create a welcoming and comfortable outdoor space. For these reasons, the project is in conformance with the Specific Plan's standards and guidelines. -2- Resolution No. xx-xx 32 NOW, THEREFORE,BE IT RESOLVED,with respect to the Vesting Tentative Parcel Map application, the Planning Commission finds based upon the information presented that: 1. The proposed map is consistent with the General Plan and any applicable specific plan, any policy or guideline implementing the General Plan (including the City’s Design Standards and Guidelines), or other applicable provisions of this Development Code; Findings: The project is consistent with the intent of the Downtown Area General Plan designation because it would provide higher-intensity residential development of a density that supports the predominantly commercial Downtown environment. The project also implements the Land Use, Housing, Community Character, and Climate Change elements by providing affordable housing near transit that is of a high-quality architectural design and that provides sustainable features like photovoltaic arrays. The project is consistent with the density range, development standards related to setbacks, height, and open space, and design standards and guidelines of the Downtown Specific Plan. The City will remain in compliance with Government Code section 65863 (No Net Loss Law). Based upon the City’s progress towards meeting the RHNA for the 2015- 2022 planning period that includes projects approved/entitled that are anticipated to pull building permits, the remaining sites inventory capacity for low income units is 159. This capacity canaccommodate the 105 units that would not be constructed on this site that are identified in the Housing Element for the Livermore Village site. A total of 140 units were moved off the Livermore Village site and will now be constructed on Pacific Avenue. Therefore, the City will maintain a sufficient supply of adequate sites in the Housing Element to meet its unmet share of the RHNA and is not required to identify additional sites. 2. The site is physically suitable for the proposed type of development; Findings: The site is located within the Downtown Core, the most densely urbanized location in Livermore. The site is entirely within the City limits and is surrounded on all sides by street rights of way and urbanized residential and commercial uses. The site is 2.5 gross acres in size and large enough to accommodate the two proposed buildings and park dedication. The site is generally rectangular in shape, allowing for regular setbacks along the site periphery and orthogonal driveway connections. The site is also relatively flat with minimal grading required; it is of a similar height as adjacent parcels. The site is devoid of vegetation and is completely urbanized. Therefore, the site is physically suitable for the proposed type of development. 3. The site is physically suitable for the proposed density of development; Findings: The Downtown is the most urban, densely developed part of the City, the Downtown Specific Plan establishes a minimum density of 30 units per acre and a maximum density of 55 units per acre within the Downtown Core, calculated on a project-wide basis. The gross acreage of the project site, which includes all three -3- Resolution No. xx-xx 33 proposed parcels, is approximately 2.5 acres, which equates to a residential density of 52 units per acre, consistent with the Downtown Specific Plan. Given its existing urbanized nature, the site is currently served by all required public utilities and services, including: water, sewer, storm drain, telecommunications, electricity, police, fire, and medical services. The project is within the Specific Plan’s and EIR’s anticipated density range, and therefore existing services have sufficient capacity to accommodate the incremental increase in demand. 4. The design of the subdivision or the proposed improvements will not cause substantial environmental damage or substantially and avoidably injure fish or wildlife or their habitat. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Commission or Council may approve a tentative map if an Environmental Impact Report was prepared with respect to the project and a statement of overriding considerations was made to the effect that specific economic, social, or other considerations make infeasible the mitigation measures or project alternatives identified in the EIR; Findings: The project proposes minor grading on a parcel with a slope less than 10 percent. In addition, the property is not a waterway and has not been designated as a scenic area. It is not located along any of the scenic routes identified in Livermore’s General Plan. The site has not been designated a wetland by the CA Natural Resources Agency. According to the CA Department of Conservation, it is not located on any faults or within any Alquist-Priolo earthquake fault zones. All waste receptacles are to be stored inside the buildings and only staged for pickup. The project is also conditioned to install interceptors in all parking garages and at the trash staging area to ensure contaminants do not enter the city storm drain or sanitary sewer system. All stormwater will be managed through stormwater retention areas, offering natural filtration. The construction site and vehicles will use the City’s construction best practices to avoid significant amounts of dust during construction. The City continues to work with the Regional Water Quality Control Board to appropriately implement site cleanup consistent with the Mitigation, Monitoring, and Reporting Program (MMRP) adopted with the certified 2009 Subsequent DSP EIR (SCH: 2008092085).The infill site is completely urbanized, graded, and topped with aggregate base material. It is currently used as a temporary surface parking lot and devoid of all trees and vegetation. It has no value as habitat for endangered, rare or threatened species. For these reasons, the design of the subdivision or the proposed improvements will not cause substantial environmental damage or substantially and avoidably injure fish or wildlife or their habitat 5. The design of the subdivision or the type of improvements will not cause serious public health problems; Findings: The project is residential in nature and will not produce noise impacts that exceed Downtown Specific Plan thresholds that anticipate a mix of residential and commercial uses. The project is conditioned to ensure interior noise levels will not exceed 45 dBA, for the health and welfare of project residents. All waste receptacles are to be stored inside the buildings and only staged for pickup. The project is also conditioned to install interceptors in all parking garages and at the trash staging area -4- Resolution No. xx-xx 34 to ensure contaminants do not enter the city storm drain or sanitary sewer system. All stormwater will be managed through stormwater retention areas, offering natural filtration. The construction site and vehicles will use the Bay Area Air Quality Management District’s(BAAQMD) construction best practices to avoid significant amounts of dust during construction. Therefore, and given the development’s residential use, the project will not produce any air or water quality impacts. The project will work with the Alameda County Vector Control to minimize vermin spread to adjacent properties. The City continues to work with the Regional Water Quality Control Board to appropriately implement site cleanup consistent with the Mitigation, Monitoring, and Reporting Program (MMRP) adopted with the certified 2009 Subsequent DSP EIR (SCH: 2008092085). The project will not produce any hazardous materials. For these reasons, the design of the subdivision or the type of improvements will not cause serious public health problems. 6. The design of the subdivision or the type of improvements will not conflict with easements, acquired by the public at large, for access through or use of property within the proposed subdivision (The Commission or Council may approve a tentative map if it finds that alternative easements for access will be provided, and that these will be substantially equivalent to ones previously acquired by the public. This Subparagraph shall apply only to easements of record or to easements established by judgment of a court of competent jurisdiction, and no authority is hereby granted to the Commission to determine that the public at large has acquired easements for access through or use of property within the proposed subdivision.); and Findings: The existing public utility easements, created by the previously approved Vesting Tentative Tract Map for the Downtown Core site, would be vacated and replaced with public utility easements along the southern and eastern property boundaries. Storm drain easements would also be provided within parcels two and three to drain Veterans Park. Veterans Park will be dedicated for public use. The existing bus turnout dedication along Railroad Avenue and the existing guy wire pole at the northeast corner of the site would be removed. The new easements are sufficient to provide stormwater retention, to the satisfaction of the City Engineer. Public access will be provided to all parcels from public streets and emergency vehicle access will be provided by an EVA along the eastern property boundary. For these reasons, the design of the subdivision or the type of improvements will not conflict with easements, acquired by the public at large, for access through or use of property within the proposed subdivision. 7. Any proposed phases and their proposed sequence of construction are identified on the submitted tentative map. The City may impose reasonable conditions relating to the filing of multiple final maps in conjunction with the approval of the tentative map (Section 66456.1). Findings: The project does not propose any phases. However, the Veterans Park design will occur at a later date, and its dedication is shown on the Vesting Tentative Parcel Map. -5- Resolution No. xx-xx 35 BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED thatthe Livermore Planning Commission, based on the above findings which are necessary to protect the public health, safety, and general welfare, recommends the City Council approve Downtown Design Review (DDR) 20-019 and Vesting Tentative Parcel Map (VTPM) 11186 – Subdivision (SUB) 21-003. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Livermore Planning Commission recommends that the City Council direct staff to file a Notice of Exemption. The documents that constitute the record of proceedings upon which this decision is based can be found in the Community Development Department 1052 S. Livermore Avenue, in Livermore, California. On the motion by Commissioner ______________ , seconded by Commissioner ____________, the foregoing Resolution was adopted at the Planning Commission meeting of April 20, 2021, by the following vote: AYES: NOES: ABSENT: Jacob Anderson, Chairperson by Steve Stewart, Planning Manager Secretary to the Planning Commission -6- Resolution No. xx-xx 36 CONDITIONS OF APPROVAL Downtown Design Review (DDR) 20-019 and Vesting Tentative Parcel Map (VTPM) 11186 – Subdivision (SUB) 21-003 Hearing to consider a request for Downtown Design Review and Vesting Tentative Parcel Map to develop the western portion of the Downtown Core site (formerly Livermore Village) with the affordable housing component of the Downtown Plan approved by the City Council on January 29, 2018. The development consists of 130 affordable residential units in two four-story buildings with underground parking. The development would include one, two, and three-bedroom units affordable to individuals and families within 20% to 60% of the Alameda County Area Median Income, landscaping, stormwater, frontage improvements, private open space, dedication of approximately 0.7 acres for a public park, and a temporary emergency vehicle access. The design of the public park is to be considered at a future date. Location: Southeast corner of Railroad Avenue and South L Street (APN: 98-289-21-1) Recommended by Planning Commission: April 20, 2021 Approved by City Council: ___________ A.PROJECT AUTHORIZATION 1.The project shall be in conformance with all City Ordinances, rules, regulations, and policies. The conditions listed below are particularly pertinent to this permit and shall not be construed to permit violation of other laws and policies not so listed. 2.Approval is limited to the conformance of the land use to Subarea Four – Special Condition Sub-district D of the Downtown Core of the Downtown Specific Plan. Use of the property shall be limited to those permitted by the Downtown Specific Plan as it exists now or may be amended in the future. 3.Vesting Tentative Parcel Map 11186 and associated Downtown Design Review shall expire unless a Final Map is filed by April 20, 2023, or a request for extension is received and approved by the City. A.PROJECT SPECIFIC CONDITIONS The applicant shall respond in writing to all conditions contained in this document and its attachments. Responses shall describe how the condition has been met and shall, where applicable, direct the plan checker to the page and/or drawing detail that demonstrates compliance with the condition. A copy of these responses shall be provided with each set of improvement plans. 1 37 1.Prior to occupancy, applicant shall complete the pedestrian pathway along Veterans Way for the entire frontage of VTPM 11186 Parcel 3, in accordance with all Engineering standard details and specifications, as approved by the Community Development Department. he project will provide resident parking at a ratio of 1:1 by leasing spaces in 2.T the L Street Garage. If the L Street garage is not operational by the time of the housing’s lease up, lease up may continue and the Community Development Department shall work mutually with Eden to identify and secure temporary parking within 600 feet of the project site. 3.Bins and carts for all waste streams (trash, recyclables, and organics) shall remain inside the designated trash rooms unless staged at the designated staging area for pickup. Upon pickup, all bins and carts shall be promptly returned to the designated trash rooms. 4.Trash, recyclable, and organic pickup shall occur prior to 8:00am, or as authorized by the Community Development Department Director. 5.Maintenance and cleaning of each trash room, trash chute, and trash staging area is the responsibility of the manager or owner of the premises. Trash chutes, rooms, and the staging area shall be maintained in clean operable conditions. Trash chutes shall be lined with galvanized steel on all sides and doors. 6.Prior to occupancy, emergency vehicle access lane along the eastern property boundary shall be graded and paved to the satisfaction of the City Engineer. 7.As part of the Building Permit submittal, the applicant shall submit a design for retractable bollards at the north and south entrances to the EVA that connects Veteran’s Way with Railroad Avenue. The design shall be consistent with the Downtown Specific Plan Design Standards and Guidelines and shall be subject to review and approval by the Community Development Department. he construction drawings shall include a photometric plan that demonstrates 8.T adequate site lighting. Parking garages shall maintain a minimum light level of one foot-candle at the parking surface. Pathways and private open space areas shall be sufficiently illuminated for safety, but respectful of the residential context. 9.Prior to occupancy, property owner shall record the deed notification provided in LMC section 8.19.050, concerning Notice of Right to Downtown Operations, on the property for which this development permit is issued. 10.The project shall demonstrate a maximum interior decibel rating of 45 dBA with windows closed, assuming 85 dBA on the first floor and an exterior noise level of 75 dBA. If noise analysis assumes closed windows 100% of the time, a fresh air ventilation system must be utilized. 2 38 11. All rooftop mechanical equipment shall be fully screened from public view. 12. All street tree wells shall be compatible in design to existing Downtown tree wells, employing similar design features like grates or coverings. 13. All trees adjacent to public infrastructure shall use control features like root barriers and engineered soils to prevent infrastructure damage. 14. Each onsite parking stall shall be numbered and assigned to each residential unit within the development. Residents shall be made aware of parking stall assignments. 15. The applicant shall demonstrate on the landscape plans compliance with the City’s Water Efficiency Ordinance, subject to Planning Division approval, prior to the issuance of any building permit. 16. Exterior backflow preventers shall be screened from public view with landscape or by other appropriate means, subject to review and approval by the Community Development Department. 17. The public art in-lieu contribution shall be paid at the time of issuance of each building permit, or the applicant shall install public art onsite in accordance with Municipal Code section 12.51. 18. The project applicant and/or contractor shall treat any human remains encountered during ground-disturbing activities in accordance with California Health and Safety Code Section 7050.5. 19. Prior to receiving a building permit for excavation, grading or construction on development site, the applicant shall contact the Alameda County Vector Control Services District to determine if any pre-baiting requirements are necessary to control migration of vermin to adjacent property. 20. For all proposed projects, Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD; “Air District”) recommends requiring the implementation of all Basic Construction Mitigation Measures, listed in Table 8-1 of the BAAQMD CEQA Guidelines, whether or not construction-related emissions exceed applicable Thresholds of Significance. 21. The project shall continue to implement the Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program prepared for the Downtown Specific Plan Amendments and Regional Performing Arts Theatre EIR, dated March 2009, except as modified by the March 29, 2019 Addendum to the Downtown Specific Plan 2009 Subsequent Environmental Impact Report. 3 39 B.GENERAL CONDITIONS OF APPROVAL 1. Development shall conform to the map designated by the City as Exhibit B-1. Exhibit B-1 plans shall include but are not limited to subdivision, landscape, and architectural plans reviewed and approved by the Planning Commission and City Council and amended by the applicant to reflect any changes indicated above in the Project Specific Conditions or required by the City in the approval process. 2. The development impact fees (e.g., traffic impact, housing in-lieu, park dedication in-lieu,) and project processing fees due in connection with this permit shall be based upon the fees in effect at the time the fee is paid. 3. The Community Development Department may approve minor amendments to the permit, provided that the permit is still in substantial conformance with the original approval. 4. Approval of the Downtown Design Review, Tentative Parcel Map, Certificate of Appropriateness, and Tree Removal permits is not an authorization to commence construction. Building construction, alterations, repairs, sign erection, or occupancy shall not be permitted without prior approval of the Building Division through issuance of any required permits. 5. To the extent permitted by law, the project applicant shall defend, indemnify and hold harmless the City, its City Council, its officers, boards, commissions, employees and agents from and against any claim, action, or proceeding brought by a third party against the indemnified parties and the applicant to attack, set aside, or void the approval of the project or any permit authorized hereby for the project, including (without limitation) reimbursing the City its attorney’s fees and costs incurred in defense of the litigation. The City may, in its sole discretion, elect to defend any such action with attorneys of its choice. C.ENGINEERING DIVISION – DEVELOPMENT 1. Development shall conform to the attached Engineering Considerations, dated April 2, 2021. D. ENGINEERING DIVISION – TRAFFIC 1. Access at the driveway on L Street should be limited to right-in and right-out only. Please work with City staff to provide appropriate signs and a channelization island at the L Street access to deter vehicles from turning left into and out of the project site. 2. Please work with staff to install signs at the entrances indicating that the garage use is for “residents only” and reservethe parking spaces to individual housing units. 4 40 3. If gates are provided at the entrances, please work with staff to install the gates at least 25 feet from back of the sidewalk so that a car waiting for the gate to open does not block the sidewalk. 4. Please remove the parking space at the northeastern corner of the North Building. E. BUILDING DIVISION 1. Project to meet the requirements of the currently adopted California Building Standards Code (CBSC). Currently, the 2019 CBSC is in effect. F. ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES DIVISION 1. The agreed upon terms of trash collection should be documented in the DDLA so that all of the special requirements and allowances will be memorialized in perpetuity for future staff and on-site property managers. 2. The waste hauler provides collection services in the downtown area in the early morning and may provide service as early as 4 AM. All containers need to be staged on the EVA trash stage the night before for collection. 3. Please add the following specifications to the proposed plan: a. Add a curb cut outside the trash rooms to allow the containers to be pulled to the storage spot more easily. b. The containers don't seem to line up between the termination room and the upper floors. Please ensure that the chutes on the upper floors will be over the center of the containers in the termination room. c.Ensure the trees/landscaping around the trash staging area won't impede servicing. d. Please add the removable bollards at the Railroad side of the EVA/walking path on the east side of the building. G. WATER RESOURCES DIVISION 1. Mandatory Minimum Full Trash Capture: The applicant shall install “full trash capture devices” on every storm drain inlet or a larger full trash capture device on the property’s storm drain outfall to treat all runoff from the developed site for trash. A full trash capture system as defined by the San Francisco Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) is any single device or series of devices that traps all particles retained by a 5 millimeter mesh screen and has a design treatment capacity of not less than the peak flow resulting from a one-year, one- hour, storm in the sub-drainage or designed to carry at least the same flow as the storm drain connected to the inlet. The device(s) must also have a trash reservoir large enough to contain a reasonable amount of trash safely without 5 41 overflowing trash into the overflow outlet between maintenance events.” RWQCB Order No. R2-2015-0049, Section C.10.a.iii). 2. Parking Garage: Interior floor drains must be plumbed to the sanitary sewer via a sand/oil interceptor. H.FIRE DEPARTMENT 1. Development shall conform to the attached memorandum from the Livermore Pleasanton Fire Department, dated March 31, 2021. I.POLICE DEPARTMENT 1. The project shall be required to conform to the provisions of the security section of the Livermore Municipal Code. Exhibits: A: Engineering Development Considerations B: Livermore Pleasanton Fire Department Memorandum 6 42 CITY OF LIVERMORE ENGINEERING CONSIDERATIONS Date:April 2, 2021 LOCATION: Livermore Village Tract Map 8574, Lot 1 DEVELOPER: Eden Housing PLANNING REFERRAL #: DDR20-019, SUB21-003 Note: Specific conditions are shown in large type. Standard conditions that apply to this project are shown in italic type. 1.DEFINITIONS: For the purpose of this agreement, the following words shall have the meanings respectively ascribed to them by this section: Developer: Person(s) or Corporation(s) that will obtain permits for construction Improvement Plans: Construction drawings for required public and private improvements Services: Utility lateral, or any portions of a conduit cable or duct, between a utility distribution line and the site it serves Project: The work to be performed by Developer 2.DOWNTOWN DESIGN REVIEW (DDR) APPROVAL A.The project shall be in conformance with all City Ordinances, rules, regulations, and policies. The conditions listed below are particularly pertinent to this permit and shall not be construed to permit violation of other laws and policies not so listed. B.Approva l or conditional approval of this DDRor tentative Map shall not supersede these Engineering Considerations and any applicable City Standards nor limit the City’s Engineer’s ability to require workable designs on future grading and improvement plans based upon these Engineering considerations and the City’s Standard engineering specifications and details. 3.VESTING TENTATIVE PARCEL MAP A.Prepare and submit the final parcelmap and the other documents required in the City of Livermore “Plan Check and Procedures Manual” including plan review fees to the Engineering Division for final review and approval. 1 43 B.The developer shall file a vesting final parcel map on behalf of the City consisting of 3 parcels, one for the public park, and the other two to be sold to Eden Housing per the provisions of the DDLA between the City and Eden Housing. 4.SPECIFIC CONDITIONS: e Developer shall comply with the following conditions: Th A.The fire service and fire sprinklers shall be connected to the potable water system. B.There is an existing pole on the Railroad Avenue frontage of this site that appears to be an anchor pole for existing overhead wiring along the north side of Railroad Avenue. The developer shall coordinate with PG&E and the City on the removal of this anchor pole. The Developer shall note this work on the approved site plans. C.The Developer shall remove the two existing streetlight poles along their Railroad Avenue frontage and return them to the City. The Developer shall install new decorative streetlights along their entire Railroad Avenue frontage matching the existing lights along their L Street frontage. The maximum spacing between these lights shall be 160 feet. The developer shall provide streetlight plans as part of their final design building permit plans. D.The proposed public park area shown on these entitlement plans are shown for reference only. The Park improvements will be entitled, designed, and constructed separately from this project as part of City Project 2021-21. E.The Regional Water Quality Control Board is providing regulatory oversite for the investigation and remediation of the existing soil, groundwater, and soil vapor contamination on this site. Remediation and mitigation plans as part of City Capital Improvement Project 2021-18 shall be approved by the Board and in place prior to starting construction on this site. The developer shall coordinate with the City and the Board to implement all the required measures as part of the approved plans per the provisions of the DDLA. F.The Developer shall remove the existing AC paved pathway along the southern frontage of this project and replace it with a new 10 foot wide decorative concrete pathway from L Street to the existing EVAE at the eastern boundary of this project sight. The developer shall remove and replace the existing ADA access ramp connecting to the existing EVAE. The Developer shall replace it with a new access ramp that conforms to the new 10 foot wide concrete pathway and finish grade of the new EVAE paving. G.The Developer shall add the following statement to their Building Permit Plans and have a CASp Certified Engineer sign and date the statement: 2 44 “The design for the pedestrian connections from the public sidewalk to existing walkways within the project site, as shown on these plans, have been reviewed by the undersigned and found to comply with the following applicable regulations: American with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements, the Public Rights-of-Way Accessibility Guidelines (PROWAG), and the requirements found in Chapter 11B of the 2019 California Building Code, and the design exceptions as approved by the City Engineer or their designee. “Name xx, CASp xx””. H.The developer shall remove existing temporary parking lighting and return to the City. 5.STORM WATER SITE DRAINAGE AND TREATMENT REQUIREMENTS: A.General 1.This site is subject to the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Program. Prior to the issuance of the initial grading or building permit, the Developer shall provide evidence that the site is covered by the statewide General Permit to Discharge Storm Water associated with construction activity. This requires confirmation that a Notice of Intent (NOI) and the applicable fee was sent to the State Water Resources Control Board. In addition, the grading plans need to state: "All grading shall be in accordance with the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan prepared by the Developer per the Notice of Intent on file with the State Water Resources Control Board". B.Storm Drainage Requirements 1.There is an existing 12” Storm drain main along Railroad Avenue and a 12” storm drain lateral stubbed to the southwest portion of this project site that discharges into an existing 30” storm drain main along Veterans Way. The Developer shall design their on-site storm drain system to outfall to these locations. All proposed private on-site forced storm drain laterals shall discharge into a catch basin and or manhole then gravity flow into the City’s storm drain system Additionally, per the City’s Facilities Planning Guidelines (dated June 2005), the flows must have the following characteristics: For a 10-year design discharge: a hydraulic grade line (HGL) is no higher than 1.25 feet below the top of curb elevation at any manhole or inlet. For a 100-year design discharge: a HGL does not exceed the top of curb elevation. (This is required for item 3 above.) For additional detail on these guidelines, the applicant should refer to the following resources: City of Livermore Storm Drain Master Plan & City of Livermore Facilities Planning Guidelines (both available at the Engineering counter at City Hall). 3 45 C.Stormwater Drainage Maintenance Funding e cost to maintain all private storm drainage infrastructure installed with this project Th shall be funded by the Developer. D.Stormwater Treatment, Detention and Trash Capture Requirements 1.The Developer shall treat the storm water runoff from this site prior to having the storm water enter the City’s storm water distribution system.Stormwater Treatment, Low Impact Development, and Trash Capture, is required by the Regional Water Quality Control Board. The Developer shall complete and or update the required Stormwater Quality Checklist.The Developer shall provide a storm water treatment plan with calculations indicating treatment that meets the latest requirements indicated in Section C.3 of the City’s NPDES Permit with the Regional Water Quality Control Board. Approval of this plan and calculations by the City is required prior to the approval of the building permit. 2.This project is greater than one acre;however the new proposed impervious surface area for this project is less than the existing impervious surface conditions. Therefore this project, per C3 guidelines and requirements will not be requiredto provide a Hydrograph Modification Plan (HMP) with calculations in accordance with the Alameda Countywide Cleanwater Program (ACCWP) Bay Area Hydrology Model (BAHM) guidelines. 3.Prior to building permit approval, the applicant shall enter into a maintenance agreement with the City of Livermore for all storm water treatment devices deemed necessary on this site. If the stormwater treatment devices will be maintained by more than one property owner a cleanout will be necessary at the property lines to allow the property owners to maintain their portion of the private stormwater treatment system. If the stormwater treatment device will be maintained by a Business Association then the cleanouts or manholes at each of the property lines may not be needed. The stormdrain treatment devices shall be shown on an exhibit and included in the Operations and Maintenance Agreement. The Operations and Maintenance Agreement shall be recorded prior to occupancy. E.Stormwater Treatment Infrastructure Maintenance Funding The cost to maintain all storm water treatment, detention and low impact development infrastructure installed with this project shall be funded by the Developer. 6.REQUIRED ON-SITE SOURCE CONTROL STORMWATER MEASURES: The Regional Water Quality Control Board adopted Order R2-2015-0049 issuing the Alameda Countywide NPDES municipal storm water permit for the Alameda Countywide Clean Water 4 46 Program. The 17 member agencies, including Livermore, are subject to this permit and all its requirements including the following: “The Permittees shall, as part of their continuous improvement process, submit enhanced new development and significant redevelopment Performance Standards that summarize source control requirements for such projects to limit pollutant generation, discharge, and runoff, to the maximum extent practicable…” accordance with this requirement, the following source control measures are included as part In of these Conditions of Approval shall be implemented as a part of this project. A.Structural Control Measures 1.Illegal Dumping to Storm Drain Inlets and Waterways On-site storm drain inlets shall be clearly marked with the words “No Dumping! Flows to Bay” on a stainless steel marker. The stainless steel markers are available for purchase from the Water Resources Division. For ordering information, please call 925-960-8100. For projects with newly-developed, privately-maintained streets, agency staff will verify that storm drain inlets have been marked before the final sign- off on the project’s building permit or encroachment permit. 2.Interior Floor Drains Approved interior floor drains shall be plumbed to the sanitary sewer system and shall not be connected to storm drain system. The applicant shall contact the Water Resources Division for specific connection and discharge requirements. 3.Parking Garages (Underground) All floor drains shall be connected to a sand/oil interceptor or equivalent water treatment device approved by the City’s Water Resources Division prior to discharging to the sanitary sewer system. 4.Pesticide/Fertilizer Application and Irrigation a.Landscaping shall be designed to minimize irrigation and runoff, promote surface infiltration where possible, minimize the use of fertilizers and pesticides that can contribute to storm water pollution, and incorporate appropriate Bay-Friendly Landscaping principles. b.If a landscaping plan is required as part of a development project application, the plan shall meet the following conditions related to reduction of pesticide use on the project site: 5 47 I.Where feasible, landscaping shall be designed and operated to treat storm water runoff by incorporating elements that collect, detain, and infiltrate runoff. In areas that provide detention of water, plants that are tolerant of saturated soil conditions and prolonged exposure to water shall be specified. II.Plant materials selected shall be appropriate to site specific characteristics such as soil type, topography, climate, amount and timing of sunlight, prevailing winds, rainfall, air movement, patterns of land use, ecological consistency and plant interactions to ensure successful establishment. III.Existing native trees, shrubs, and ground cover shall be retained and incorporated into the landscape plan to the maximum extent practicable. IV.Unless otherwise specified, proper maintenance of landscaping shall be the responsibility of the property owner. V.Integrated pest management (IPM) principles and techniques shall be encouraged as part of the landscaping design. Some examples of IPM principles and techniques include the following: i.Select plants that are well adapted to soil conditions at the site. ii.Select plants that are well adapted to sun and shade conditions at the site. Consider future conditions when plants reach maturity. Consider seasonal changes and time of day. iii.Provide irrigation appropriate to the water requirements of the selected plants. iv.Select pest and disease resistant plants. v.Plant a diversity of species to prevent a potential pest infestation from affecting the entire landscaping plan. vi.Use “insectary” plants in the landscaping to attract and keep beneficial insects. VI.Landscaping shall also comply with City of Livermore’s “Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance”. However, areas of a site used for bio-swales or other landscaped areas that function as a storm water treatment measure shall be exempt from the Water Efficient Landscaping requirements. VII.An efficient irrigation system shall be installed in areas requiring irrigation. An example of an efficient irrigation system is one that includes a weather- based (automatic, self-adjusting) irrigation controller with a moisture and/or rain sensor shutoff, and in which sprinkler and spray heads are not permitted in areas less than 8 feet wide. 6 48 5.Refuse Areas w or redevelopment projects shall provide a roofed and enclosed area for a.Ne dumpsters, recycling containers, compactors, and food waste containers. The area shall be designed to prevent water run-on to the area, to prevent runoff from the refuse area and to properly contain litter and trash. Dumpster leakage from covered food/trash compactor enclosures shall drain to the sanitary sewer via connection to an approved oil and grease interceptor device. b.Runoff from trash enclosures, recycling areas, and/or food compactor enclosures or similar facilities shall not discharge directly to the storm drain system. Trash enclosure areas shall be designed to avoid run-on to the trash enclosure area. In most cases, drains are not permitted within trash enclosure areas. A drain, however, must be provided for compactors. If a drain is required in or beneath dumpsters, compactors, and tallow bin areas, it shall be connected to a grease removal device prior to discharging to the sanitary sewer. c.The Developer shall construct a new concrete pad with curbing for the proposed trash pickup/staging area along the east side of the north building adjacent to the K Street/EVAE. The concrete pad shall be designed such that no trash or food waste will enter into the City’s storm drain system 6.Outdoor Equipment/Materials Storage a.All outdoor equipment and materials storage areas shall be covered and/or bermed, or shall be designed with Best Management Practices (BMP) that effectively minimize the potential runoff and contact of storm water to pollutants. b.Storage areas containing non-hazardous liquids shall be covered by a roof and be contained by berms, dikes, liners, vaults or similar spill containment devices. c.All on-site hazardous materials and wastes, as defined and/or regulated by the California Public Health Code must be used, managed, and stored in compliance with the applicable Livermore Pleasanton Fire Department’s requirements and regulations. 7.Fire Sprinkler Test Water Provisions shall be made in the project design and construction to allow for the discharge of fire sprinkler test water to an onsite vegetated area. If this is not feasible, provide for discharge to the sanitary sewer in accordance with current plumbing codes. 8.Miscellaneous Drain or Wash Water a.Boiler drain lines shall be connected to the sanitary sewer system and may not discharge to the storm drain system. 7 49 b.For small air conditioning units, air conditioning condensate shall be directed to landscaped areas as a minimum BMP. For large air conditioning units, in new developments or significant redevelopments, condensation lines shall be connected to the sanitary sewer system, wherever feasible. c.Roof drains shall discharge and drain away from the building foundation to landscaped areas wherever feasible. hing and/or steam cleaning activities must be performed at an appropriately d.Was equipped facility that drains to the sanitary sewer as specified in Section J. Any outdoor washing or pressure washing must be in compliance with the City’s Stormwater Management Program requirements and managed in such a way that there is no discharge of soaps or other pollutants to the storm drain system. The applicant shall contact the Water Resources Division for specific discharge requirements. 9.Architectural Copper Installation Projects with architectural copper should, if possible, purchase copper materials that have been pre-patinated at the factory. Whether patination is done offsite or onsite, applicant should consider coating the copper materials with an impervious coating that prevents further corrosion and runoff. If patination is done on-site, implement one or both of the following: a.Collect rinse water in a tank and pump to the sanitary sewer. Contact the City of Livermore Water Resources before discharging to the sanitary sewer. b.Collect the rinse water in a tank and haul off-site for proper disposal. B.OPERATIONAL BMPS This section details Best Management Practices (BMP) that private property owners and/or the occupants of private property must implement following the construction of projects. Ultimately, the responsibility for implementation of these BMPs rests with the property owners. The City of Livermore’s Source Control Program routinely performs inspections of industrial and commercial sites to verify BMP implementation and effectiveness. 1.Paved Sidewalks and Parking Lots Sidewalks and parking lots shall be swept regularly to minimize the accumulation of litter and debris. Wash water resulting from the pressure washing of parking lots must be captured, pretreated (if necessary) to meet local discharge limits, and discharged to the sanitary sewer. Wash water resulting from the pressure washing of sidewalks may be allowed to drain to the storm drain system provided that (a) no soap or other cleaning agents are used, and (b) all debris are trapped and collected to 8 50 prevent entry into the storm drain system. Under no circumstances shall wash water containing any soap or other cleaning agents be discharged to the storm drain system. 2.Private Utilities and Common Areas a.For residential developments, where other maintenance mechanisms are not applicable or otherwise in place, a Property Owners Association, Landscape & Lighting District, or an equivalent mechanism shall be created and shall be responsible for maintaining all private utilities and other privately owned common areas and facilities on the site including landscaping. These maintenance responsibilities shall include implementing and maintaining storm water BMPs associated with improvements and landscaping. CC&R’s creating the association shall be reviewed and approved by the City prior to the recordation of the Final Map and recorded prior to the sale of the first residential unit. The CC&R’s or Landscape & Lighting District or an equivalent mechanism shall describe how the storm water BMPs associated with privately owned improvements and landscaping shall be maintained and detail contact information for the entity responsible for such maintenance activities. 3.On-site Storm Drains All on-site storm drains must be inspected and, if necessary, cleaned at least once a year immediately prior to the rainy season. 4.Architectural Copper Cleaning, Treating or Washing When cleaning, treating or washing architectural copper features, implement one or both of the following: a.Collect rinse water in a tank and pump to the sanitary sewer. Contact the City of Livermore Water Resources before discharging to the sanitary sewer. b.Collect the rinse water in a tank and haul off-site for proper disposal. 7.STREETS: A.The developer shall remove and replace all damaged sidewalk along Railroad Avenue and the L Street frontage and install new tree wells within sidewalk area as necessary to install new street trees per City Standard Detail L-3B or similar alternative detail approved by the City. The developer shall also modify the existing tree wells to match the new tree wells being installed. B.The existing Wheels bus stop with shelter located along the Railroad Avenue frontage of this project just east of L Street shall remain where located. 9 51 C.The Developer shall install new curb, gutter and sidewalk along the eastern boundary of the project sight and shall grade and pave the existing 26 foot wide EVAE (K Street extension) from Railroad Avenue to Veterans Way to allow for emergency vehicles and trash collection vehicles to serve their development. Finish grading shall conform to the back of existing sidewalk behind the existing driveway approach at Railroad Avenue and the existing Veterans Way entry improvements. Drainage of the EVAE shall be the same as it is today. D.The developer shall remove the existing driveway approach and sidewalk at the entry of the K Street/EVAE along Railroad Avenue and replace with a rolled curb and 10 foot wide sidewalk the full width of the existing driveway approach area. The rolled curb area shall be painted red for a fire lane. “Do Not Enter” signage shall be added at the entry facing Railroad Avenue to deter vehicles other than emergency vehicles from entering the EVAE. Card actuated retractable bollards shall be installed across the EVAE set back enough to allow a trash and or Emergency Vehicle to enter the EVAE and clear Railroad Avenue and on the south side of the existing pedestrian walkway near Veterans Way. Costs associated with the retractable bollards are per the provisions of the DDLA between the City and Eden Housing. 8.MEDIANS AND OTHER LANDSCAPED AREAS Since the City has a new centralized irrigation system with a computer terminal and modem located at the City’s Maintenance Service Center, the Developer shall install a City standard centralized irrigation controller system with communication accessories as approved by the City. The City may exempt this requirement based on the limited size of the landscape area. See Section 4D above regarding future public park improvements. 9.SPECIAL DISTRICTS A.Landscaping and Lighting Maintenance and Operation is Development is within the existing Downtown Landscape Maintenance District and shall Th continue to be assessed in accordance with the District. 10.STA N DARD CONDITIONS: A.The Developer shall field verify the locations of all existing utility systems (water, sewer, drainage, electric, gas, etc.) that are necessary for this project. B.The Developer shall extend necessary utilities to this site so that this project can be connected to them. 10 52 C.Submit plans of all existing and proposed public improvements, sanitary sewer and water services, and on-site storm drainage, for review and approval prior to building permit issuance. D.Construct underground utility services (electric, phone, etc.) to the site. These services are typically from the utility mains that are located along a site’s street frontage(s). The Developer shall note this work on the approved site plans. E.Construct functional systems foron-site and off-site storm drainage, sanitary sewerage, and water. I.Intercept and dispose of existing drainage upgrade from the site by an approved storm drainage system to avoid off-site ponding or the concentration of the natural run-off along the periphery of the site. Complete sufficient off-site investigation to insure that the plans clearly delineate existing conditions. J.Install a cleanout behind the public sidewalk to provide for cleaning the laterals from the cleanout to the sewer main. K.Install fire hydrants per Fire Marshal’s recommendation. J.A separate water meter(s) shall be provided for the irrigation of the landscaping. K.Contact the California Water Service Company (the provider of water to this part of the City) at (925) 447-4900 regarding water service requirements, requests, or questions. Water service installations and removals shall be coordinated with both the California Water Service Company and the City’s public works inspector. All water system designs, including water service laterals, shall be approved by Cal Water prior to building permit approval. L.The fire service backflow preventer(s) shall be effectively screened from the public right- of-way while at the same time preserving ease of maintenance access to the backflow preventer(s). Screening shall be as specified on City Standard Detail W-10A, B and C. The fire service backflow preventer(s) shall meet the performance standards of the backflow preventer shown in City Standard Detail W-10A, B and C. The fire service(s) shall be located so that the fire service backflow preventer(s) can be screened without blocking sight distance at driveways and intersections. M.Provide adequate sight distance at all driveways and intersections. Monument signs and landscaping at driveways shall be located so that they don’t restrict the sight distance of exiting drivers. Landscaping and mounding in the sight distance area along the street shall be kept to a maximum height of 2.5 feet above the top of street curb. Tree branches in the area shall be trimmed to be a minimum of 8 feet above the top of the street curb. N.All new driveways shall be installed per City Standard Detail ST-8 11 53 O.Utility cuts in the frontage street along this project will require a micro seal across the entire street frontage of Railroad Avenue and base repairs as needed followed by a micro seal across the entire street frontage of L Street to water seal the street surface, to restore the ride quality of the street surface, and to restore the appearance of the street surface. P.Modify signing and striping as necessary. Q.Install a "Right Turn Only" standard sign on the site facing traffic exiting from the Railroad Avenue underground garage driveway. R.Add a one-way sign in the median island opposite the Railroad Avenue underground garage driveway. S.Install streetlights along Railroad Avenue. See Specific Condition Section 3C. Include a street light conduit plan in the plan set for proposed public improvements. T.Install a mailbox for each unit at a location and of a design approved by the Livermore Post Office and the City. The Developer shall submit a mailbox plan (locations and sizes) that has been approved by the Livermore Post Office with the first submittal of the improvement plans. The first submittal of the improvement plans shall show the mailboxes in the Livermore Post Office approved locations. U.Show all necessary erosion control measures on the improvement plans. In addition, the following notes shall be included on the improvement plans: 1.Construction Operations - Dust shall be controlled. Wastewater generated during construction shall not be discharged to the storm drain system. This includes waste from painting, sawcutting, concrete work, etc. The contractor shall make arrangements to eliminate discharges to the storm drain system and, if necessary, provide an area for on-site washing activities during construction. Materials that could contaminate storm runoff shall be stored in areas that are designed to prevent exposure to rainfall and to not allow storm water to run onto the area. 2.Pavement Cleaning - Flushing of streets/parking lots to remove dirt and construction debris is prohibited unless proper sediment controls are used. Preferably, areas requiring cleaning should be swept. V.Prepare all public improvement plans in conformance with the latest edition of the following City of Livermore documents: 1.Standard Specifications and Details 2.Development Plan Check and Procedures Manual W.Submit for approval a cost estimate for the public improvements. 12 54 X.Submit a certificate of insurance in the form and with the coverages required by the City. btain an Encroachment Permit from the City’s Permit Center at (925) 960-4440, prior to Y.O starting any public improvements. Construct all public improvements per City standard details and specifications. eplace any broken or displaced curbs, gutters, sidewalks and driveways. The Z.R Engineering Division at (925) 960-4500 will mark the location of these defective facilities upon request by the Developer. AA. Complete all public improvements prior to occupancy, except that the Developer may formally request to defer items that are not related to public safety. Any request to receive occupancy prior to the completion of all public improvements shall be submitted in writing to the City Engineer and shall include the reasons that justify the request, and the number of weeks after occupancy that are needed to complete the improvements. If the request is approved by the City Engineer, the Developer may submit a cash bond in the amount of 200% of the cost of the deferred improvements with a letter that states that if the Developer has not completed the improvements by the date established by the City Engineer, the Developer will forfeit the entire cash bond to the City. The Developer's letter shall also state that the Developer understands that the City will use the forfeited funds to complete the improvements, and that the Developer also understands that the City will retain any unspent portion of the funds for administrative expenses. BB. Submit descriptions, plats and deed documents for all necessary right-of-way and easement dedications for review and approval. The City will only accept right-of-way and easement dedications after the improvements required over said dedications have been completed by the Developer and approved by the City. The Developer shall not receive approval for occupancy until required dedications have been accepted. 11.DEVELOPMENT FEES: A.Pay current development fee rates as adopted by the City Council. (They may be adjusted from time to time to reflect the cost of providing a facility.) The fees shall be those that are in effect on the date the City receives a complete application for a building permit. The City’s “Development Fees” information sheet has the following fees that apply to this project: City Storm Drainage (none required if Pre-project impervious surface is greater that post project impervious surface) County Storm Drainage (none required if Pre-project impervious surface is greater that post project impervious surface) Sanitary Sewer Connection Encroachment Permit Inspection for Public Improvements Building Permit 13 55 Park Facilities Fee City Water Connection (N/A in California Water Service Company Area) Alameda County Water Connection, Zone 7 Tax on Construction (Exempt based upon Housing Agreement) In-Lieu Low Income Housing Fee (Exempt based upon Housing Agreement) Traffic Impact Fee Improvement Plan Check Fee Tri-Valley Transportation(Exempt per Ordinance) Art in Public Places General Plan Cost Recovery Social and Human Services(Exempt based upon Housing Agreement) School Impact Fees (contact the Livermore School District at (925) 606-3200.) B.There are existing fee credits for this site based upon the previous existing retail development. Credits will be proportionally split between all of the proposed projects indicated on the approved downtown plan based upon the size of their sites. 12.INFORMATION FOR THE DEVELOPER: There are City Municipal Code requirements regarding the quality of water that is discharged to the sanitary sewer and the storm drainage systems. The Developer should contact the City's Water Resources Division at (925) 960-8100. BGV:JW:PGL:MAP S:\\Section Folders\\Development Section\\Planning 14 56 Date: March 31, 2021 To: City of Livermore Planning From: Ryan Rucker, Deputy Chief / Fire Marshal Subject: Approval conditions for DDR20-019 2139 Railroad AVE Downtown Livermore Workforce Housing Conditions of Approval 1.Provide hydrants at a maximum spacing of 350 feet around the building. Note that hydrants on South L St and Railroad Ave must be on the same side of the street as the building. 2.Provide elevation views of ground ladder access (at a 75 degree angle) for all typical second and third floor bedroom rescue windows. 3.Provide a typical ground ladder access pad detail 4.Emergency responder radio coverage is required in accordance with section 510 of the fire code. 5.A sprinkler system is required in accordance with section 903 of the fire code with local ordinances. 6.A standpipe system is required in accordance with section 905 of the fire code. 7.Fire flow shall be in accordance with appendix B of the fire code with a 50 percent reduction for sprinklers. 8.FIRE HAZARDS: The project developer shall keep the site free of fire hazards from the start of lumber construction until the final inspection in accordance with chapter 33 of the fire code. 57 9. FIRE PROTECTION FACILITIES: Prior to any construction framing, the applicantshall provide adequate fire protection facilities, including, but not limited to a water supply and water flow in conformance to the City's Fire Department Standards able to suppress a major fire. 10. WATER FLOW AND CONTROL VALVES: All fire sprinkler system water flow and control valves shall be complete and serviceable prior to final inspection. Prior to the occupancy of a building having a fire alarm system, the Fire Department shall test and witness the operation of the fire alarm system. 11. ELECTRICAL CONDUIT: Electrical conduit shall be provided to each fire protection system control valve including all valve(s) at the water connections. The Livermore-Pleasanton Fire Department requires electronic supervision of all valves for automatic sprinkler systems and fire protection systems. 12. LISTED: All commercial, industrial, and multi-family residential occupancies shall have valve tamper and water flow connected to a listed Central Station Service in accordance with NFPA 72. Fire Department plan check includes specifications, monitoring, installation, and alarm company certificates. Fire alarm control panel and remote annunciation shall be at location(s) approved by the Fire Prevention Bureau. All systems shall be point identified by individual device and annunciated by device type and point. 13. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS: Should any operation or business activity involve the use, storage or handling of hazardous materials, the firm shall be responsible for contacting the Livermore-Pleasanton Fire Department prior to commencing operations. Please contact the Hazardous Materials Coordinator at 925/454-2361. 14. FIRE HYDRANTS: Fire hydrants shall be installed at spacing not greater than 300 feet in industrial and commercial developments. Fire hydrants shall be installed at spacing not greater than 400 feet in residential developments. 15. FIRE LANE MARKING: On-site access ways and internal drives shall be designated as fire lanes and identified as such by red curb striping and posted with signs. Signs shall be according to State standards and read “No Parking – Fire Lane.” The red curb striping, sign location(s), and sign 58 language shall be included in the building permit submittal for review and approval by the Fire Department prior to building permit issuance. 16. FIREVEHICLE ACCESS ROADS: Access roads shall have 13 feet, 6 inches unobstructed vertical clearance, 20 feet of unobstructed width (26 feet where occupied building floors exceed 30 feet height), and inside turning radius of 45 feet and outside turning radius of 55 feet. Unobstructed shall mean a clear travel way, excluding parking width, and designed for an emergency vehicle weight of 70,000 pounds under all weather conditions. Unobstructed width shall not include the width of rolled curbs, sidewalks, or non-drivable surfaces. 17. FIRE VEHICLE TURNAROUNDS: Where Fire Department vehicle access through or around a site involves changes in direction or curves, inside radius of 45 feet and outside radius of 55 feet shall be provided to facilitate fire truck turning radius for entry and exit from the site. Dead-end access ways and internal drives shall not exceed 300 feet in length and shall terminate in cul-de-sacs no less than 96 feet in diameter or hammer-head (tee). Standards and options are available through the Livermore- Pleasanton Fire Department, Fire Prevention Bureau. 18. PREMISES IDENTIFICATION: Address numbers shall be installed on the front or primary entrance for all buildings. Minimum building address character size shall be 12-inch high by 1-inch stroke. In all cases address numerals shall be of contrasting background and clearly visible in accordance with the Livermore-Pleasanton Fire Department Premises Identification Standards. This may warrant field verification and adjustments based upon topography, landscaping or other obstructions. 19. COMMERCIAL – NEW CONSTRUCTION: The following items shall be provided prior to any construction above the foundation or slab. a. Emergency vehicle access shall be provided to the site, including areas where construction is occurring. If Public Works Improvements are part of the project to access the site, an emergency vehicle access plan shall be submitted for review and approval to the Fire Department. b. If permanent access or site paving is not provided, the carrying capacity of the emergency vehicle access shall be 70,000 pounds under all weather conditions. 59 c.Site staging area(s) shall be provided for materials and equipment. All staging areas shall be outside of the emergency vehicle access route shown on the approved plans. d. Where on-site fire hydrant(s) are required, they shall be installed, flushed and all valves open prior to any construction above the foundation or slab. This includes concrete tilt-up and masonry buildings. e. On-site fire hydrant(s) shall not be obstructed and shall be sufficiently above grade to have all hydrant valves and outlets accessible for emergency use. f. Where a project is phased as part of the development, specific access, water supply and fire hydrant installations will be required as part of each phase. As needed a phasing plan with these improvements will be required. g. Where on-site grading/utility plans are submitted for review and approval prior to building construction drawings, emergency vehicle access routes, fire hydrant locations, material staging areas, etc. shall be provided. 20. FINAL INSPECTION: Prior to request for final inspection, all access roads, on-site access and fire hydrants shall be provided. All fire hydrants shall be accepted, inspected and tested to applicable City Standards. 60 C.1 251.00604-02-21 COVER SHEETVESTING TENTATIVE PARCEL MAPVERTICAL CLEARANCE PROFILES JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 HAYWARD, CA 945415865 OWENS DRIVEPLEASANTON, CA 94588LUK AND ASSOCIATES738 ALFRED NOBEL DR.HERCULES, CA 94547MILLER COMPANY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS1585 FOLSOM STREETSAN FRANCISCO, CA 94103 PROJECT DIRECTORY:OWNER/DEVELOPER EDEN HOUSING 22645 GRAND STREET DAHLIN GROUPCIVIL ENGINEERLANDSCAPE ARCHITECT DRAWING INDEX:GENERAL:C.1CIVIL:C4.1 PRE.GRADING PLAN: ELEVATIONSC4.2 VEHICULAR DRIVEWAY C5.1 PRE. UTILITY PLANC5.2 PRE. UTILITY PLANC6.1 PRE. STORMWATER TREATMENT PLANC7.1 BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICESLANDSCAPE:L100 DOWNTOWN LIVERMORE SITE PLANL101 LANDSCAPE SITE PLANL102 LANDSCAPE ENLARGEMENT PLANSL103 LANDSCAPE STREETSCAPE SECTIONSL104 LANDSCAPE PLANTING PALETTEL105 LANDSCAPE PLANTING PALETTE ARCHITECTARCHITECTURAL:A.1 LIVERMORE VILLAGE SITE PLANA.2 SITE PLANA.3 BASEMENT GARAGE PLANA.4 1ST FLOOR PLANA.5 2ND FLOOR PLANA.6 3RD FLOOR PLANA.7 4TH FLOOR PLANA.8 ROOF PLANA.9 UNIT PLANS - 1 BEDROOMA.10 UNIT PLANS - 1 BEDROOMA.11 UNIT PLANS - 2 BEDROOMA.12 UNIT PLANS - 2 BEDROOMA.13 UNIT PLANS - 3 BEDROOMA.14 UNIT PLANS - 3 BEDROOMA.15 ELEVATIONS - NORTH BUILDINGA.16 ELEVATIONS - NORTH BUILDINGA.17 ELEVATIONS - SOUTH BUILDINGA.18 ELEVATIONS - SOUTH BUILDINGA.19 MATERIAL BOARDA.20 BUILDING SECTIONA.21 FIRET RUCK AND LADDER PAD SECTIONA.22 KEY SITE MAP - PERSPECTIVE VIEWSA.23 PERSPECTIVEA.24 PERSPECTIVEA.25 PERSPECTIVEA.26 PERSPECTIVEA.27 PERSPECTIVEA.28 PERSPECTIVEA.29 PERSPECTIVEA.30 PERSPECTIVEA.31 PERSPECTIVE ±2.5 ACRES36,685 SF31,165 SF23,911 SF91,761 SF 2 (SOUTH) = 134 (NORTH)= 84 (SOUTH)= 8 (NORTH)= 5 (SOUTH)= 3 (NORTH)== 40 (NORTH)= 23 (SOUTH)= 5= 31= 4= 117= 16(1 SPACE/DU) 22,765 SF (NORTH BUILDING) = 26 (23 REQUIRED PER DSP)15,566 SF (SOUTH BUILDING)52 DU/A (±2.5 ACRES) COVER SHEET GARAGE SPACES ON PARKING LIFTS = 34GARAGE STANDARD SPACES AT GRADE = 28GARAGE COMPACT SPACES AT GRADE = 15 (18%)TOTAL RESIDENTIAL SPACES (NORTH) = 82(79 REQUIRED AS ALLOWED BY DENSITY BONUS PROVISIONS)TOTAL RESIDENTIAL SPACES (SOUTH) =35(51 REQUIRED AS ALLOWED BY DENSITY BONUS PROVISIONS) FUTURE EV CHARGING SPACES REQUIRED (3% PER CALGREEN SECTION 4.106.4.2)) DSP CHAPTER 8, P.8) PARKING PROVIDED:NORTH BUILDING PARKING: ACCESSIBLE SPACES SOUTH BUILDING PARKING: SPACES AT GRADE ACCESSIBLE SPACES PROJECT SITE, AS ALLOWED BY THE DSP.)FUTURE EV CHARGING SPACE = 3 (NORTH), 2 (SOUTH)RESIDENT BIKE PARKING PROVIDED: = 54 (40 REQUIRED PER DSP)SITE AREA: PARCEL AREA NORTH BUILDING PARCEL: SOUTH BUILDING PARCEL: CHIMNEY CHIMNEYBUILDING FOOTPRINT: LOT COVERAGE: NOT REQUIRED PER DSPDENSITY:STORIES: FOUR STORIES TYPE VA OVER TYPE 1A BASEMENT DOWNTOWN LIVERMORE RESIDENTIAL PARKING REQUIRED:GUEST SPACES REQUIRED (1/10 UNITS, PER DSP, CHAPTER 8) GRAND TOTAL SPACES FOR THE PROJECT = 133(GUEST SPACES WILL BE PROVIDED OFFSITE WITHIN ±75 FEET OF THE SITE ZONING INFORMATION:ALLOWABLE BUILDING HEIGHT:ACTUAL NORTH BUILDING HEIGHT: ACTUAL SOUTH BUILDING HEIGHT: TOTAL SPACES REQUIRED (1.75/2+BR UNIT, 1.5/1 BR UNIT PER DSP) TOTAL BIKE PARKING REQUIRED (1BIKE SPACE/4 BEDROOMS PER TOTAL PARKING ON-SITE TOTAL PARKING OFF-SITE TOTAL PARCEL AREA: ZONING: DSP 13 GUEST SPACES WILL BE PROVIDEDVETERANS PARK PARCEL: = 1,282 SF= 3,446 SF= 317 SF= 353 SF 1. OFFSITE UNIT PARKING LOCATION (IN L STREET GARAGE)2. REDUCTION IN UNIT PARKING SPACE QUANTITY( TO 1:1 RATIO)3. REDUCTION IN COMPACT PARKING SPACE DIMENSION (FROM 18 FEET TO 16 FEET DEPTH)4. REDUCTION IN STANDARD PARKING SPACE WIDTH (FROM 8.5 TO 8.0 FEET.) I. PARKING DENSITY BONUS REQUESTED INCENTIVES:OPEN SPACE:PUBLIC OPEN SPACE REQUIRED 150 SF/UNIT PER DSPPRIVATE OPEN SPACE REQUIRED 60 SF/UNIT PER DSPPUBLIC OPEN SPACE PROVIDED:PRIVATE OPEN SPACE PROVIDED:OPEN COURTYARD (NORTH) OPEN TERRACE (NORTH) OPEN DECKS (NORTH) PLAY AREA & OPEN TERRACE (SOUTH) = 3,038 SFPORCH (SOUTH COMMUNITY ROOM) = 370 SFOPEN DECKS (SOUTH) (PARK AREA/UNITS) 31,165 SF/130 SF = 240 SFTOTAL PRIVATE OPEN SPACE/130 UNITS = 68 SF 16-113121 TOTALSTOTALS 3 BR UNIT (SF) 3 BR3 BR 2 BR2 BR 1 UNIT TYPES 3 4 2 BR UNIT (SF)2A = 766 3A = 1,0172B = 760 3B = 9972C = 805 3C = 9942D = 840 3D = 9662E = 714 SOUTH BUILDING NORTH BUILDING 1 BR 565 1 BR 6 PROJECT DATA 50% 12 35 15 62MGRS. UNIT 1 50% 15 5 5 25MGRS. UNIT GRAND TOTAL: 130 UNITS AMI 20% 60% TOTALS 17 42 20 79 AMI 40% 60% 354TOTALS 24 14 13 51 AVE. UNIT SIZE 1 BR UNIT (SF) 1A = 529 1B = 498 1C = 632 1D = 584 1E = 545 1F = 4981G = 5991H = 6051 BR = 561 SF 2 BR = 777 SF 3 BR= 994 SF LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA VICINITY MAP RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 61 62 0251.006 2021-04-02 JOB NO.5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 DATE RAILROAD AND L STREET LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA 63 0251.006 2021-04-02 JOB NO.5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 DATE RAILROAD AND L STREET LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA 64 0251.006 2021-04-02 JOB NO.5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 DATE RAILROAD AND L STREET LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA 65 0251.006 2021-04-02 JOB NO.5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 DATE RAILROAD AND L STREET LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA 66 0251.006 2021-04-02 JOB NO.5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 DATE RAILROAD AND L STREET LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA 67 0251.006 2021-04-02 JOB NO.5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 DATE RAILROAD AND L STREET LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA 68 N 11 .. AA 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 0 40 80 160 LIVERMORE VILLAGE SITE PLAN LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 69 N A.2 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 0 16 32 64 SITE PLAN LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 70 N A.3 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 0 16 32 64 BASEMENT GARAGE LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 71 N A.4 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 0 16 32 64 1ST FLOOR PLAN LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 72 N A.5 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 0 16 32 64 2ND FLOOR PLAN LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 73 N A.6 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 0 16 32 64 3RD FLOOR PLAN LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 74 N A.7 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 0 16 32 64 4TH FLOOR PLAN LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 75 N A.8 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 0 16 32 64 9'-7"90'-3" 10'-0" 5:12 5:12 5:12 5:12 5:12 5:12 ROOF PLAN 5:12 5:12 1/4:12 5:12 1/4:12 1/4:121/4:121/4:121/4:121/4:121/4:12 5:12 5:12 5:12 1/4:12 5:12 1/4:12 5:12 5:12 5:12 5:12 1/4:12 5:12 5:125:12 8'-8" 1/4:12 101'-2" 1/4:121/4:125:12 1/4:12 80'-6" 1/4:12 5:12 5:125:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 5:12 5:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 5:12 1/4:12 5:12 34'-11" 5:12 1/4:121/4:121/4:121/4:12 5:12 5:12 5:121/4:12 5:12 5:125:12 5:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 5:121/4:12 1/4:121/4:12 1/4:12 5:125:121/4:121/4:12 " 2 / 1 1 - ' 6 5:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 5:125:12 5:125:12 1/4:12 5:12 5:125:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 5:125:12 5:12 ROOF 1/4:12 BUILDING A 1/4:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 5:12 5:125:121/4:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 5:125:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 5:125:12 ROOF 1/4:12 1/4:12 BUILDING B 5:125:12 5:125:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 217'-7" 1/4:12 1/4:12 5:125:121/4:121/4:12 1/4:12 5:121/4:12 1/4:125:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 5:12 1/4:12 5:12 1/4:12 5:125:12 1/4:12 5:12 1/4:12 5:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 5:12 5:12 5:12 1/4:12 1/4:12 5:12 1/4:12 5:121/4:12 1/4:12 5:12 1/4:12 5:12 5:12 1/4:121/4:121/4:121/4:12 5:125:12 5:121/4:121/4:121/4:121/4:121/4:121/4:12 5:125:12 5:125:12 1/4:12 5:12 1/4:125:12 5:12 5:12 1/4:12 5:121/4:12 1/4:12 5:125:125:12 5:12 5:125:12 5:125:12 8'-7" 10'-8" 68'-3"62'-9 1/2"53'-5"21'-11"12'-2" LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 76 N A.9 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 0 4 8 16 1-BEDROOM UNIT PLAN - 1A, 1B, 1C & 1D LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 77 N A.10 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 0 4 8 16 1-BEDROOM UNIT PLAN - 1E, 1F, 1G & 1H LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 78 N A.11 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 0 4 8 16 2-BEDROOM UNIT PLAN - 2A, 2B & 2C LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 79 N A.12 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 0 4 8 16 2-BEDROOM UNIT PLAN - 2D & 2E LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 80 N A.13 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 0 4 8 16 3-BEDROOM UNIT PLAN - 3A, 3B & 3C LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 81 N A.14 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 0 4 8 16 3-BEDROOM UNIT PLAN - 3D LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 82 A.15 251.00604-02-21 0 8 16 32 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 EAST ELEVATION - EVA ELEVATION NORTH ELEVATION - RAILROAD AVE. ELEVATION NORTH BUILDING NORTH & EAST ELEVATIONS LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 83 A.16 251.00604-02-21 0 8 16 32 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 SOUTH ELEVATION - PARK ELEVATION WEST ELEVATION - SOUTH L STREET ELEVATION NORTH BUILDING SOUTH & WEST ELEVATIONS LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 84 A.17 251.00604-02-21 0 8 16 32 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 SOUTH BUILDING EAST ELEVATION - PARK ELEVATION NORTH ELEVATION - PARK ELEVATION NORTH & EAST ELEVATIONS LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 85 A.18 251.00604-02-21 0 8 16 32 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 SOUTH BUILDING SOUTH & WEST ELEVATIONS SOUTH ELEVATION - VETERANS WAY ELEVATION WEST ELEVATION - SOUTH L STREET ELEVATION LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 86 A.19 251.00604-02-21 WALLSCONCEMETAL DOWNSPOUT 0 8 16 32 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 SPANISH TILE WALLSCONE STUCCO COLOR A COLOR C CORBELS TRASH ROOM STUCCO COLOR B & MATERIALS IMAGES IRON PRELIMINARY FURNISHINGS WINDOW GRILLE CHIMNEY BUTTRESS WALL SPANISH S TILE SPANISH TILES IRON WINDOW GRILLE CORBELS COLOR B COLOR C METAL ROOF STUCCO COLOR A RECESSED VINYL WINDOW COLOR C METAL DOWNSPOUT COLOR CBENJAMIN MOORESUMMER HIGHTS 777 STUCCO COLOR B STUCCO COLOR A METAL ROOF COLOR C RECESSED VINYL WINDOW BENJAMIN MOORE COLOR BCHANTILLY LACE2121-70 CHIMNEY COLOR B SPANISH S TILE COLOR ABENJAMIN MOOREICE FOGCSP-575 ROOF RAKE & BUTTRESS DETAIL LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA SMOOTH STUCCO RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 87 A.20 251.00604-02-21 VETERANS WAY 0 8 16 32 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 P.L. SOUTH GARAGE LEVEL 4LEVEL 3LEVEL 2LEVEL 1PARKING BUILDING BUILDING SECTION P.L. LEVEL 1 T.O.RIDGELEVEL 4LEVEL 3LEVEL 2 T.O.ROOF +533.50'@ 48'-11"+484.60'@ 0'-0" +524.60'@ 40'-0"+514.60'@ 30'-0"+504.60'@ 20'-0"+494.60'@ 10'-0" VETERANS PARK P.L. LEVEL 4LEVEL 3LEVEL 2LEVEL 1NORTH GARAGE PARKING BUILDING P.L. LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 88 RAILROAD AVE. T.O.RIDGE@ 45'0"+528.90'T.O.ROOF@ 40'-0"+523.90'LEVEL 4@ 30'-0"+513.90'LEVEL 3@ 20'-0"+503.90'LEVEL 2@ 10'-0"+493.90'LEVEL 1@ 0'-0"+483.90' N A.21 VETERANS WAY 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 0 4 8 16 3'-0" 8'-0" ±32'-4" ±29'-4" FIRE TRUCK AND LADDER PAD SECTION T.O.ROOF@40'-0"+524.60'LEVEL 4@30'-0"+514.60'LEVEL 3@20'-0"+504.60'LEVEL 2@10'-0"+494.60'LEVEL 1@0'-0"+484.60' LADDER PAD 6'-0" 70° max. 6'-0" 2'-0" 1'-0" 3'-0" T.O.ROOF@ 40'-0"+523.90'@ 30'-0"+513.90'@ 20'-0"+503.90'@10'-0"+493.90'@ 0'-0"+483.90' LEVEL 4LEVEL 3LEVEL 2LEVEL 1 LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 89 N A.22 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 0 16 32 64 A30 A26 A25 A28 A27 KEY SITE MAP - PERSPECTIVE USE A24 A29 A23 A31 LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 90 A.23 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 PERSPECTIVE VIEW LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 91 A.24 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 PERSPECTIVE VIEW LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 92 A.25 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 PERSPECTIVE VIEW LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 93 A.26 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 PERSPECTIVE VIEW LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 94 A.27 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 PERSPECTIVE VIEW LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 95 A.28 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 PERSPECTIVE VIEW LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 96 A.29 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 PERSPECTIVE VIEW LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 97 A.30 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 PERSPECTIVE VIEW LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 98 A.31 251.00604-02-21 JOB NO.DATE 5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 PERSPECTIVE VIEW LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AND SOUTH L STREET 99 N L100 0251.006 04.02.21 JOB NO.5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 DATE LANEWAY DOWNTOWN LIVERMORE SITE PLAN VETERANS WAY PROJECT SITE NORTH BUILDINGFUTURE VETERANS PARKSOUTH BUILDING RAILROAD AND L STREET LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA 100 L101 Acer rubrumArctostaphylos manzanitaCercis occidentalis asplenifoliusPistacia chinensisPlatanus racemosaQuercus lobata(Location of trees are to be determined in later stage) 0251.006 04.02.21 REGULAR ON-SITE TREE LEGEND JOB NO.5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 DATE N Chitalpa tashkentensisQuercus virginiana Ulmus parvifolia Zelkova serrata LEGEND SITE PERIMETER 1. (E) BUS SHELTER 2. (N) STREET TREES (DOUBLE ROW) - SEE STREET TREE LEGEND3. CITY CONCRETE SIDEWALK4. DRIVEWAY CURB CUT TO BASEMENT GARAGE5. CURB CUT TO LANEWAY6. CONCRETE SIDEWALK FLUSH WITH ADJACENT SIDEWALK 7. REMOVABLE BOLLARDS9. (E) PARKING 10. (E) STORMWATER BASIN W/ NEW PLANTING11. (E) STREET LIGHTS12. PLANTING AREA13. (E) BRICK PAVING STRIP ALONG SIDEWALK EDGE14. BIKE RACKS15. (E) RAISED UTILITY BOX W/ BOLLARDS AND WATER METER AND SUPPLY LINE NORTH BUILDING PARCEL 16. LARGE SCALE ORNAMENTAL SHRUBS AT CORNER17. ENTRY WALKWAY AND STAIRS TO LOBBY 18. ACCESSIBLE WALKWAY WITH GUARDRAIL TO ENTRY / TRASH ROOM19. DRIVEWAY TO BASEMENT GARAGE20. AT GRADE BIO-RETENTION SWALE21. RAISED PLANTER ON PODIUM22. PODIUM COURTYARD (SEE ENLARGED PLAN ON SHEET L102)24. CONCRETE WALKWAY25. CONCRETE MOW BAND AT LOT LINES 26. SHADE AND ORNAMENTAL TREES 27. STORMWATER MEDIA FILTER (SEE CIVIL DRAWINGS)28. TRASH PAD (SEE ENLARGED PLAN ON SHEET L102)SOUTH BUILDING PARCEL 29. WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE RAMP30. RAISED PLANTER ON PODIUM31. PLANTING32. CONCRETE MOW BAND AT LOT LINE33. COMMUNAL SEATING AREA34. SHADE AND ORNAMENTAL TREES35. CONCRETE WALKWAY36. PLAY AREA WITH LOW PERIMETER FENCE (SEE ENLARGED PLAN ON SHEET L102)37. RAISED STORMWATER PLANTER 38. COVERED PORCH AND RAISED PLANTER(SEE ENLARGED PLAN ON SHEET L102)39. STORMWATER MEDIA FILTER (SEE CIVIL DRAWINGS)40. STAIRS AND WALKWAY 41. ROOF OVERHANG 42. STORMWATER PLANTER UNDER ROOF OVERHANG(NOTE: TREES LOCATED IN PARK SHALL BE COORDINATED WITH PARK DESIGN. CURRENTLY THEY ARE SHOWN IN PARK TO KEEP FROM THE BUILDING WALL TO ALLOW TREE CANOPIES TO GROW.)STREET TREE LEGEND LANEWAY ROOMS COMPUTER ROOM COMMUNITY LOBBY VETERANS WAY E U N E TRASH ROOM V A D B B A LANDSCAPE SITE PLAN O R L I A R SOUTH BUILDING NORTH BUILDING C RAILROAD AND L STREET LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA SOUTH L STREET C 101 N L102 ROOM COMMUNITY 0251.006 04.02.21 JOB NO.5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 DATE LEGEND NORTH BUILDING PODIUM COURTYARD 1. U-SHAPED COMMUNAL SEATING AND LOW TABLE 2. RAISED PLANTER AND POTS3. UNIT PAVERS ON PEDESTAL SUPPORT4. WROUGHT IRON FENCE AND MAINTENANCE GATE5. OFF-SET CONCRETE WALKWAY DISCOURAGING PUBLIC ACCESS6. TREES AND UNDER STORY SHRUB PLANTING NORTH BUILDING TRASH PAD 8. ROLLED CURB 9. LANE WAY10. REMOVABLE BOLLARDS 11. CONCRETE WALKWAY TO SIDEWALK12. PLANTING AREA SOUTH BUILDING PORCH AREA AT EAST END 13. ROOF OVERHANG AND COLUMNS14. CONCRETE PORCH AREA WITH MOVABLE CHAIRS15. RAISED STORM WATER PLANTER 16. CONCRETE WALKWAY17. CONCRETE MOW BAND FLUSH WITH PAVING SOUTH BUILDING 19. RAISED PLANTER ON PODIUM 21. RESILIENT RUBBER SAFETY SURFACE22. PLAY EQUIPMENT 23. BENCHES24. TREES AND PLANTING AT GRADE 26. GATE 27. CONCRETE WALKWAY28. COMMUNAL SEATING AREA WITH OVERHEAD TRELLIS AND BENCHES29. STORMWATER MEDIA FILTER (SEE CIVIL DRAWINGS)30. CONCRETE MOW BAND AT LOT LINE ROOM COMMUNITY SOUTH BUILDING PORCH AREA LANDSCAPE ENLARGEMENT PLANS RAILROAD AND L STREET LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA 102 ROOM NORTH BUILDING COURTYARDNORTH BUILDING TRASH PADSOUTH BUILDING PRIVATE OPEN SPACE AND PLAY AREA COMPUTER L103 0251.006 04.02.21 JOB NO.5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 DATE SOUTH L- STREET EDGE BRICK PAVING AREA PLANTING SIDEWALK LINE CONCRETE PROPERTY AREA PLANTING RAMP ACCESS WHEELCHAIR SECTION B-B: SOUTH L STREET LANDSCAPE STREETSCAPE SECTIONS VETERANS WAY WALKWAY CONCRETE AREA PLANTING AREA PLANTING ASPHALT SIDEWALK PLANTER AT GRADE BIO-RETENTION LINE PROPERTY AREA LINE PLANTING AREA PROPERTY PLANTING SIDEWALK CONCRETE SECTION A-A: VETERANS WAY RAILROAD AND L STREET LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA RAILROAD AVENUE SECTION C-C: RAILROAD AVENUE 103 Pollinator Plants L104 CA CA NATIVE NATIVE 0251.006 04.02.21 JOB NO.5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 DATE Chinese Pistache Pistacia chinensis Western Red Bud Cercis occidentalisDudleya brittonii Dwarf Mat Rush CA NATIVE Red Maple Valley Oak Quercus lobata Fortnight Lily Dietes bicolor Sea Lavender Limonium perezii REGULAR TREE CA CA NATIVE NATIVE Chitalpa Chitalpa tashkentensis California Sycamore Platanus racemosa Wild Lilac Ceanothus spp. Dwarf Yellow Poker Plant CA CA CA NATIVE NATIVE NATIVE Chinese ElmCatalina IronwoodBush Anemone Carpenteria californica Toyon Heteromeles arbutifolia LANDSCAPE PLANTING PALETTE CACA CA NATIVENATIVE NATIVE Southern Live Oak Quercus Virginiana SilktasselShowy Milweed Asclepias speciosa Common Yarrow Achillea millefolium CACACA NATIVENATIVENATIVE Japanese zelkovaDr. Hurd Mazanita TreeManzanita Arctostaphylos spp.Wild Buckwheat Eriogonum spp. RAILROAD AND L STREET LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA SHRUBS & GRASSES STREET TREES REGULAR TREE 104 Pollinator Plants L105 CACA CA NATIVENATIVE NATIVE 0251.006 04.02.21 JOB NO.5865 Owens DrivePleasanton, CA 94588925-251-7200 DATE CA NATIVE CA Native SageCalifornia Fuchsia Epilobium canum spp. canum California Gray RushSugar Scoop CACACA NATIVENATIVENATIVE Mock Orange Pittosporum tobira Seaside DaisyIsland Alum Root Heuchera maxima Black Elderberry Sambucus nigra CA CACACA NATIVE NATIVENATIVENATIVE Foothill Penstemon Penstemon heterophyllus Pigeon Point Coyote BrushTufted Hair Grass Deschampsia caespitosa Bush Monkey Flower STORMWATER CA CACACA NATIVE NATIVENATIVENATIVE Deer Grass Muhlenbergia rigens Woods Compact ManzanitaCreeping SageOregon Grape Mahonia aquifolium GROUND COVERS CA CA NATIVE LANDSCAPE PLANTING PALETTE NATIVE Bush Monkey FlowerDwarf Coast RosemaryWestern Marsh Rosemary Limonium californicum CACACA NATIVENATIVENATIVE Silver Bush Lupine Lupinus albifrons Golden Rod Solidago spp.Blue Oat GrassGiant Wildrye RAILROAD AND L STREET LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA STORMWATER SHRUBS & GRASSESGROUND COVERS 105 February 23, 2021 Livermore City Council 1052 S. Livermore Ave. Livermore, CA 94550 RE: Supportfor Eden Housing Downtown Livermore Project Dear Mayor Woernerand Members of the City Council, The Bay Area Council is a public policy advocacyorganizationworking to support civic and business leaders . This letter is written in support of for its potential to create desperately needed affordable housingnear transit. California is experiencing an unprecedented housing crisis that will worsen without significant intervention. The California Department of Housing and Community Development estimates that the state must build 180,000 new units of housing annually by 2025 t-over 100,000 more units than we are currently creating. This shortage will disproportionately impact low-income communities and communities of colorthat are being priced out of Bay Area communities fromthe lack of affordable housing options. To combat this, every county and city must do its part to produce more housing and particularly affordable housing when it is proposed.This project will also serve to meet th low-incomeRHNA goals, ofwhich only 15 percent has been completed for the 5RHNAcycle. Edenproject proposes to create 130 new affordable homesin Downtown Livermore, all of which will be availableto households with 20-60 percent AMI.We recommend that the maximum numberof housing units that are financiallyfeasible arerealizedthrough this project to make the largest impacton our housing crisis.While we recognize this project is in a relatively conceptual stage, westrongly support the creation of new housing andbelieve it iscritically important to construct housing at transit hubs and adjacent to job centers. This project is located inthe heart of Downtown Livermorenear ,which will provide residents with easy access to the ACE train station and local/regional busesand within easy walking distance to downtown businesses.The project willredevelop an abandoned commercial siteandprovide much needed housing, retail, and public space to the community, including the development of a public park that is expected to feature interactive and historical artwork. This site is an excellent candidate for dense, mixed-use developmentdirectly adjacent to transitand within a downtown contextto grow the supply ofhousingand reduce dependence on cars. We look forward to reviewing details of the project when it is further resolved andencourage you to support transit-oriented, walkabledevelopment of this nature. Sincerely, Matt Regan Senior Vice President, Bay Area Council 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113